Concurrent / Plenary Sessions

Thursday

Time
1:30pm - 2:30pm
Plenary Presentation: Neuroscience, Learning Science and Other Claims for the Classroom: What Sort of Evidence Makes It Pedagogy?
Ballroom
Abstract:
In an era of evidence-based practice, what does science have to offer the university teacher? We are confronted with "Brain-Based" strategies based upon outdated neuromyths, discussions of neuroscience that seldom offer data about how the derived pedagogical strategies actually impact learning, or data from laboratory settings that may not generalize to typical classroom settings. In this presentation, we will review the experimental literature related to various pedagogical strategies and contrast those findings with the literature on student learning in classroom settings with the goal of determining what questions teachers need to have answered before they should consider a strategy promising for classroom use, and what questions researchers (and publishers) should address before making such claims.
David Daniel
2:50pm - 3:30pm
Design-Based Research: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Teaching Practice
Severn
Abstract:
Design-based research is a relatively new research approach. This new research methodology has a number of positive characteristics that can be used to positively enhance teaching and learning in higher education settings. The purpose of this session is to make the participants aware of this research approach and how to conduct this type of mixed methods research. The presenter will also share evidence of how this approach has been used to examine teaching approaches in her own classroom setting to determine effective strategies.

Objectives:
  • The participants will gain an awareness of design-based research and what it is used for;
  • The participants will gain an awareness of the design-based research protocol;
  • The participants will gain an awareness of the positives of design-based research and how it can directly influence teaching;
  • The participants will gain an awareness of the limitations of design-based research.
Helen Crompton
2:50pm - 3:30pm
Effects of Elements of Course Organization on Student Learning
Embassy
Abstract:
Presentation of course material, establishment of classroom environment, and evaluation of student learning are elements of course organization. In this session I describe a project focused on student perceptions of instructor preparedness and organization, accessibility of online grades and assignments, and complexity of the readings and assignments with respect to student learning. Surveys inquired about classroom climate, student learning, course objectives and learning outcomes, and instructor preparedness and efficacy in teaching. We will discuss surveys and supplemental measures of teaching effectiveness such as end-of-term measures, classroom observations, and SGID results that could be used to improve effectiveness in course organization.

Objectives:
  • To recognize aspects of organization that facilitate or hinder student learning;
  • To utilize online course sites effectively;
  • To identify the ways students perceptions translate into assessment of course and instructor effectiveness.
Heidi Ewen
2:50pm - 3:30pm
Giving Feedback on Students' Written Work: Efficient and Effective
Ambassador
Abstract:
This session will provide support for instructors through the process of responding to student writing in an effective and efficient manner. Guided by previous research, we will review a feedback framework which will inform participants throughout the session. After identifying their role as the reviewer, participants will explore the purpose of different writing assignments, review their goals for student feedback, and note what types of feedback can be used to achieve these goals. We will close with an applied example where we discuss ways to provide the most effective feedback to students in an efficient manner.

Objectives:
  • Explore a framework for responding to student writing;
  • Identify and discuss different kinds of written feedback;
  • Discuss examples of written work and practice responding positively and effectively.
2:50pm - 3:30pm
How to Use Prezi to Make Your Presentation More Engaging
Patuxent
Abstract:
In order to make instructional approach more effective, college instructors can make use of innovative online tools and resources to make their presentation more engaging. This presentation will explore an online tool Prezi by focusing on tricks or techniques with which instructors can design their presentation slides in three-dimension format. With the help of such a 3-D dimensional format, explaining complicated theories and principles becomes easier for instructors and students are more likely to understand the inner relationship between among different theories. The presentation will also try to explore how to convert Ppt lectures to Prezi-format presentation.

Objectives:
  • Know how to use Prezi to make presentation slides;
  • Know how to demonstrate theories in 3-dimension format;
  • Know how to convert Ppt lecture slides to Prezi slides.
Wei Zha
2:50pm - 3:30pm
Leadership 101: Preparing Undergraduates to be Change Agents
Congressional
Abstract:
Abstract: Now, more than ever, higher education administration and faculty are asked to be accountable--to justify their curricula and the manner in which they prepare undergraduates to be marketable, change agents, and effective leaders in a progressive and competitive world. Participants will learn the structure of a new upper level undergraduate course developed to expose undergraduates to contemporary frameworks of change theory and their fundamental components, in order to become effective change agents and leaders within their area(s) of expertise. Fundamental to this learning experience, participants will have the opportunity to use the frameworks to reflect on their own experiences and challenges with change.

Objectives:
  • Learn the current reasons for radical changes in higher education and the need for administration and faculty to substantiate their curricula for undergraduates' real world preparation. Specifically, do we provide undergraduates with the knowledge and skills to be effective leaders and change agents within a competitive and progressive work force and culture? (Comprehend);
  • Learners will complete a 10-item sentence completion activity to reveal their own perspective(s) on change and how they function within and during change. (Analyze);
  • Learn the development and content of a new undergraduate course on leadership and change, including at least 2 change frameworks for effective change implementation. (Comprehend);
  • Learners will brainstorm how they can integrate this information into their undergraduate (and graduate students) courses and/or within their own professions. (Create).
2:50pm - 3:10pm
Reshaping "Contact Time" in a Small Liberal Arts Classroom
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Over the past decade, blended learning has become more in vogue as technology has become simpler and less expensive to use. Nevertheless blended learning pedagogies have not been examined thoroughly, particularly in small liberal arts institutions where small class size and traditional classroom settings still predominate. This study examines two semesters of a flipped course. Student academic performance, engagement, as well as instructor evaluations and actual vs. projected "contact time" are examined and compared with the same course taught traditionally. Overall, students perform equal to or better in a flipped setting with significantly less instructor contact time.

Objectives:
  • Participants will gain an expanded understanding of the concept and policy of "contact time" with students in an undergraduate setting;
  • Participants will gain an increased appreciation for student academic performance, engagement and outlook in traditional versus blended learning environments ;
  • Participants will gain insight and an expanded skill set for how to combine traditional pedagogy and online technology to improve the academic experience for students in a liberal arts classroom.
Matt Rearick
2:50pm - 3:30pm
Transforming a College to Embrace Active Learning and Flipped Classrooms
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
This session will describe how the faculty, students, and administration changed the culture at Sierra Nevada College from low student engagement, little active learning, no scholarship of teaching, little undergraduate research and low expectations of students into a vibrant culture of student engagement, deep learning, high expectations, flipped classrooms, and innovation. The session will present how we changed the culture and how others may change the culture at their institution.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn how to leverage what they learn at the Lilly Conference to make real change at their institution;
  • Participants will learn key fundamental steps to transform their department, school, or college to more fully embrace academic innovation;
  • Participants will learn the importance role of focusing on student learning outcomes to lead academic innovation;
  • Participants will learn the crucial importance of building trust and patience in leading academic innovation.
Lynn Gillette
3:15pm - 3:35pm
Word Clouds: A Tool to Build Professionalism
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Engaging students in discussions of professionalism is challenging. In order to challenge the students' early views of professionalism, it is important for them to identify what traits they currently believe represent "being a professional". With that knowledge, faculty can then promote group discussion on the topic of professionalism. Words clouds are an excellent tool to promote a discussion on professionalism and have been used in an entry level professional degree program in physical therapy. Examples from two cohorts will be shared and compared.

Objectives:
At the conclusion of the session, the participant will:
  • Recognize the value of word clouds to promote discussion and comparisons;
  • Select two topics for which the use of word clouds could promote small group discussion;
  • Identify three possible opportunities for use of word clouds in current curricula
Rhea Cohn
3:45pm - 4:25pm
"I hated it at the time": Student and Teacher Perspectives on Effective Assessment
Severn
Abstract:
Have you ever wondered what your students think about those weekly reading quizzes? Our empirical study explores the perceived effectiveness of assessment tools from both the instructor and student perspective. Concentrating on large courses at a research university, we report on the data from surveys of both instructors and students. During our presentation, we will share our list of top assessments that enhance student learning and describe the mismatch between instructor and student perceptions. We will then facilitate a discussion on the effectiveness of different assessment practices and how to incorporate recommended assessments into the curriculum.

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
  • Compare and contrast features of effective assignments as identified by university students with those identified by instructors;
  • Discuss the barriers impeding effective assessment practices from being implemented (especially in large classes) at the university level;
  • Develop, based on presenters' research findings and participants?? expertise, practically feasible ways for instructors to improve assessment practices;
  • Apply tools learned in the presentation to design or adapt an existing assessment (of their own).
3:45pm - 4:25pm
Bringing Global Cultural Diversity into Classroom
Patuxent
Abstract:
Culture is an important construct in fashion business because culture has a profound influence on all aspects of fashion consumer behavior and impacts every aspect of fashion industry. Recognizing the importance of cultural diversity and international perspectives on college curriculum and the dramatic increase in the number of international students enrolled in U.S. higher education, we developed a collaborative approach by involving on-campus international students in course project. Our example from one Fashion Merchandising class highlights the effectiveness of bringing global perspectives and culture diversity into classroom by developing the teaching and learning linkage with on-campus international students.

Objectives:
  • Appreciating global cultural diversity in textile and apparel higher education;
  • Developing the teaching and learning linkage with on-campus international students;
  • Bringing global perspectives and culture diversity into classroom.
Jin Su
3:45pm - 4:05pm
Computer-Assisted Learning Technology to Enhance Clinical Decision-Making Skills of Physical Therapist Students
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Computer-assisted learning (CAL) modules have gained popularity as an innovative teaching method. Clinical fields require students to develop decision-making skills that translate from the classroom to patient care. Our team of educators, clinicians and instructional designers developed a series of five CAL modules to prepare physical therapist students for practice in the hospital environment. Processes used to develop the modules include: formulating curricular objectives, developing content, identifying and establishing outcome measurements of student performance, and collaborating with instructional designers. Student feedback regarding their perception of the CAL experience and highlights of some of the modules will be shared.

Objectives:
  • Identify the pedagogical basis for using computer assisted learning modules to enhance clinical decision making skills in health care practitioners;
  • Explain the process of creating curricular objectives and outcome measures based on current content and resources;
  • Describe the collaborative process involved in creating a computer assisted learning module for health care practitioners.
3:45pm - 5:20pm
Encouraging and Assessing Student Reflection
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
This workshop will help participants enhance the reflective assignments in their curriculum. Participants will be guided through a process comparing the ways in which they currently use, encourage and assess reflection with practices suggested in the literature. They will have the opportunity to develop a new reflective assignment or revise a current one with intensive support from the workshop facilitators. Participants will leave the session with a handout of key information, including sample grading rubrics and a reference list; a design/redesign of one of their reflective assignments, and an action plan based on their reflections of their use of reflection.

Objectives:
  • Identify ways to motivate student reflection;
  • Identify strategies to overcome barriers to student reflection;
  • Recognize requirements for effectively developing and assessing reflective assignments;
  • Formulate/reformulate a grading/feedback rubric for reflective assignments.
3:45pm - 4:25pm
Launching Undergraduates into the World of Scholarship: Reading Scholarly Literature
Ambassador
Abstract:
Undergraduate students at research institutions are challenged to engage in scholarly research, yet many students do not know how to approach the task of reading scholarly literature. The prerequisite to creating research is understanding how to read and interpret scholarly articles. Even though students may conduct research in diverse areas, there are components in research common to all scholarly texts written for virtually any discipline. Knowing how to navigate the world of scholarship is a skill that should be incorporated into classes early in the college career to help students build a bridge to academic success.

Objectives:
  • Students will learn that scholarship in virtually any field of discipline follows a pattern of common elements and learn to locate and identify three common components of a text in a scholarly journal;
  • Students will learn to define and identify information referencing previous scholarship in the body of the text and footnotes ("research terrain");
  • Students will learn to define and identify the author's perceived deficiencies in previous scholarship ("niche" or opportunity for further research);
  • Students will learn to define and identify the author's purpose for writing ("thesis statement").
Susan Norland
3:45pm - 4:25pm
Moving from the Individual to the Communal Space through Digital Multimodal Composing
Embassy
Abstract:
With the shift from individual acquisition to artifact mediated collaborative participation, using different modes of technology in teaching writing is a great opportunity to further enhance students' writing competency. We have begun to ask questions about how digital assignments enhance the student's composition process. Results from this study and the collected data-including students' brainstorming activities, interactions, script writings and revisions, reflections, and feedback-will hopefully initiate a community of inquiry and discussion/reflections about curriculum design and encourage important adjustments based on students' feedback and progress.

Objectives:
  • Understand how digital assignments enhance the student's composition process;
  • Pay particular attention to how the students use multimodalties to collaborate and interact to present their thoughts and arguments to their intended audiences;
  • The goal of the study is to allow research and practice to inform each other in ways that help develop pedagogical practices aimed at engaging writers in 21st century academic literacy skills;
  • Results from this study and the collected data "including students' brainstorming activities, interactions, script writings and revisions, reflections, and feedback" will hopefully initiate a community of inquiry and discussion/reflections about curriculum design as well as teaching/researching more generally.
3:45pm - 5:20pm
Using Universal Design for Learning in the College Classroom
Congressional
Abstract:
This presentation will briefly describe Universal Design for Learning and why it is important for Institutes of Higher Education and their students in the 21st century. Using a hands-on workshop approach, the main focus of the presentation will be to inform participants of ways they can incorporate Universal Design for Learning into their classrooms to engage students and promote success for all.

Objectives:
  • The audience will discover why using Universal Design for Learning is beneficial in the University classroom;
  • The audience will understand the 3 components of Universal Design for Learning;
  • The audience will learn what Shepherd University is currently doing to facilitate Universal Design for Learning;
  • The audience will discuss ways that Universal Design for Learning can be woven into their University classrooms.
4:10pm - 4:30pm
Paving the Way for Online Adult Learners in a Professional Healthcare Program: A Philosophical Approach
Susquehanna
Abstract:
The addition of a distance education track quickly increased our Medical Laboratory Science Program's steady state enrollment from 60 to 600. A robust student support system had long been a hallmark of our campus track; the faculty's goal was to maintain that approach in the new online track regardless of enrollment. Over time, a series of online supportive measures was developed and implemented in order to meet the needs of our students. Among those were one-on-one chats, counselling sessions and telephone calls; examination remediation and learning contracts. National board examination scores, retention and graduation rates remain well above average.

Objectives:
  • Describe the challenges involved in creating a student centered environment in a large distance program;
  • Explain the disparate demography that exists within the program's distance student population;
  • Discuss the measures implemented to safe guard student success;
  • Discuss programmatic student outcomes data.
4:40pm - 5:00pm
Assessing Student Class Participation
Susquehanna
Abstract:
This presentation explores the latest literature on how to assess student learning as we shift from traditional lectures to an active classroom environment. We ask how instructors can fairly and transparently assess soft skills, such as participation, teamwork, and risk taking. The presenters offer a draft rubric spelling out a method for assessing participation and open the subject for audience input.

Objectives:
  • Discuss the latest literature on how to assess student class participation;
  • People attending this panel will receive a draft rubric to assess class participation and thoughts on how to structure classes to maximize student activity in the class;
  • Participants will learn how instructors should reassess their roles in light of the new emphasis on class participation;
  • How can we incorporate technology such as smartphones, laptops and other devices to enhance student learning and participation.
4:40pm - 5:20pm
Facilitating Diversity and Transformative Dialogue in the Online Learning Environment
Ambassador
Abstract:
Drawing from the transformative learning and online course development literature, this workshop engages participants in the development of online transformative dialogue. This workshop explores many of the benefits of transformative dialogue in the online learning environment and identifies the limitations of integrating student diversity into online learning. Using multiple online teaching platform examples, participants are provided with strategies for supporting students' diversity of identity and facilitating ongoing transformative dialogue within the online classroom. This workshop concludes in an integrated example of planning for online transformative dialogue, using the presenter's online forensic social work course.

Objectives:
  • Participants will identify the pedagogical benefits of engaging student differences through transformative dialogue in the online environment;
  • Participants will identify opportunities and strategies for the development of online transformative dialogue, using both synchronous and asynchronous web-based and course platform tools;
  • Participants will identify the benefits of and consider opportunities for the development of transformative dialogue exercises, specific to their own classrooms.
4:40pm - 5:20pm
Triadic Small Group Teaching and Learning
Severn
Abstract:
Small group teaching has increased in popularity as a move away from traditional lectures and towards active learning. Small group size and related activities in the literature on teaching and learning vary from 3-50 students and may include working in pairs. Yet few examples exist of triadic small group teaching where two students interact and their interactions are scored by a third student. This method incorporates peer evaluation of a skill so encourages listening and practice. Student reflections on this classroom technique used in a child language course are presented along with suggestions for other disciplines.

Objectives:
  • Create two designs of checklists for students to use for peer evaluation in small groups;
  • List three types of triadic learning groups;
  • Describe two challenges and two benefits of triadic small group teaching with peer evaluation.
Eva Nwokah
4:40pm - 5:20pm
Using Text Messaging to Teach Basic Concepts
Patuxent
Abstract:
Advances in modern technology have presented new opportunities for the use of innovative teaching methods. A collaborative of family medicine faculty from eleven residency programs across the country developed electronically-Generated Educational Messages (eGEMs) focusing on musculoskeletal medicine. Each eGEM is a question in text message format. This presentation will review how to use text messages to deliver educational content, including sample text messages and an overview of the eGEMs program. We will review the benefits and drawbacks of using text messaging in education based on our experience and feedback from residents who received the text messages. We will also review how to develop and deliver curricular content using text.

Objectives:
  • To explain how a collaborative group from eleven family medicine residency programs implemented a texting program to teach family medicine residents musculoskeletal medicine;
  • To describe how to develop and implement a text message-based curriculum;
  • To develop text messages in a question and answer format that could be delivered to medical students or residents at the participants home institutions.
4:40pm - 5:20pm
Visual Thinking Strategies: Encouraging Critical Reflection through Visual Literacy
Embassy
Abstract:
Bombarded with visual imagery, students today decode images constantly, but often without realizing their full complexity. Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS), which fosters critical discussion to arrive at a deeper understanding and analysis of the images students encounter, is a classroom technique developed in recent years based on empirical research into visual literacy. This strategy arms participants with three simple questions, which require the students to make careful observations, articulate those observations, and then provide visual evidence to support their claims. Originally designed for use in museums, VTS facilitates the process of critical thinking through observation and justification across disciplines.

Objectives:
  • Understand the theory and research behind Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS);
  • Participate as a student in a VTS-based discussion of different images, resulting in an ability to implement the strategy in the classroom;
  • Develop ideas on how this strategy can fit into their own curricula.
5:05pm - 5:25pm
Reality-Based Course Design for Today's Student
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Observation and research indicates that a lack of student engagement results in students electing to opt out of learning in favor of just attaining a "grade." This makes for a less than rewarding experience for both students and their instructors. However, by designing and delivering courses with multiple active learning activities, especially problem-based learning and uniquely designed 'reality' learning experiences, not only is interest, engagement and motivation significantly higher, but so is the ability to achieve necessary student learning objectives. By utilizing a "reality-based" classroom that models real world situations, student learning can be easily activated and maintained.

Objectives:
  • Assess their course approach and determine how to drive needed, increased student engagement and incorporate at least one relevant reality-based exercise/assignment into their course(s) going forward;
  • Evaluate various assessment methods designed to measure reality-based course design;
  • Determine the most appropriate assessment tool(s) given their decision to incorporate a reality-based exercise(s)/assignment(s) into their course.
Richard Minoff
5:40pm - 6:20pm
A Picture for a Thousand Words: Video Feedback & Student Engagement
Embassy
Abstract:
This presentation explores ways that freely available, screen capture software can provide students with annotated video samples of assignments and with video feedback on their own work. The presentation will also demonstrate how this technology can be used interactively in the classroom to create collaborative, archival resources to guide students in ongoing assignments. Building on examples from a business writing course and an introduction to literature course, participants will engage in guided brainstorming to discover how this tool can be purposefully integrated into a variety of disciplines to generate greater student engagement and interactive learning.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn the ease of creating video feedback and best practices for creating video feedback;
  • Participants will be consider how screen capture videos can encourage student engagement and enhance their courses;
  • Participants will be guided in exploring the possibilities of using video feedback in their courses.
5:40pm - 6:20pm
Early Identification of Online Students with Language and Writing Challenges
Ambassador
Abstract:
In an online environment, writing becomes is a primary mode of communication via discussion boards, e-mail, papers, and other written expressions. Depending on the course design, a student's entire academic identity may rely on their ability to write effectively. Further, the online student is heavily dependent on reading comprehension to fulfill assignments requirements and obtain subject-related information. Identifying students with composition and comprehension issues before they are actively engaged in their first semester is problematic. This session will describe an intervention for earlier assessment and identification of challenged students to enable the timely facilitation of referral to services and resources.

Objectives:
At the completion of this session the attendee will be able to:
  • Discuss the admission application / student performance dichotomy;
  • Discuss using a proctored writing assessment as a tool for identifying students with challenges;
  • Discuss the multiple interventions designed to assist students to succeed online.
5:40pm - 6:20pm
Interprofessional Education: Improving Student Perceptions, Attitudes, and Readiness
Patuxent
Abstract:
As health care delivery continues to evolve around the notion of a team of care providers working together to improve patient outcomes, interprofessional education becomes a critical component of success. Regardless of primary discipline, educators' focus should be on providing their students interprofessional experiences that can transform the way they learn and practice with members from other disciplines. Students' success in such interprofessional experiences largely depends on their perceptions and attitudes towards interprofessional education. This workshop is intended to provide educators a variety of tools for assessing their students' perceptions and attitudes towards interprofessional education in health care.

Objectives:
  • Discuss expected benefits/outcomes of interprofessional education;
  • Evaluate students' perceptions regarding interprofessional education;
  • Evaluate students' attitudes toward interprofessional health care teams;
  • Assess students' readiness for interprofessional learning;
  • Develop approaches to promote learning and performing with students of other professions.
Ozgur Ekmekci
5:40pm - 6:20pm
Introducing Parent Collaboration to the Discipline of Pre-Service Teachers Using Social Media in Early Childhood Education
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Collaboration with families is a foundation in early childhood education (Copple & Bredekamp, 2009). Social media may present a relevant means of collaboration for a new generation of families. In this study, teachers in a university lab school posted videos and pictures together with comments on the social media site Kinfish for use by children and their families. Parents were introduced to Kinfish at a parent meeting in September 2013 when we began to analyze usage. Because the lab school is used extensively as a teaching field site, issues such as what to post and when on social media are a part of pre-service teacher.

Objectives:
  • Successful strategies on how to introduce a secure social media site to parents of young children;
  • Teaching pre-service teachers on engaging parents using social media;
  • Important criteria for the selection of type of social media;
  • Parental use of the social media site with their child.
5:40pm - 6:20pm
Reflective Practice in 140 Characters or Less
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
Reflection is critical in professional and personal development. Thoughtful reflection provides individuals a means to identify personal strengths and areas for further development. In the past, personal journals served as a primary platform for self-reflection; however, technology has expanded options to provide interaction with others to practice reflective skills. This presentation will describe how Twitter was used to enhance graduate students' abilities to develop focused reflections on their clinical experiences and actively use social media as a platform for professional dialogue with their peers. Participants will be encouraged to share their experiences with social media in the classroom setting.

Objectives:
By the end of the session, the participant will:
  • Explore the use of a microblog as a platform to create learning communities in which students reflect upon and discuss their off-campus learning experiences with peers;
  • Discuss the use of social media as a tool for teaching reflection and professional communication skills;
  • Identify additional uses for microblogs within a course or a program of study to create reflective learning communities.
5:40pm - 6:20pm
Research in Science: A Seminar for Recruiting Freshmen in STEM
Congressional
Abstract:
We are piloting a freshman course called Research in Science (RIS) with the objective of engaging incoming students in STEM fields early in their undergraduate careers. Surveys show that such an intervention has a significant impact on retention of undergraduate STEM majors. Students in RIS develop an appreciation for research by analyzing models of creativity and innovation, learning about research programs at GW and the broader community, gaining scientific literature search skills, and writing their own proposals for summer research projects. Session participants will experience effective elements of the course, and we will present assessments of the course and outline future directions.

Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to explain ideas about how freshmen can gain knowledge and skills about STEM research;
  • Participants will be able to name the key elements of the Research in Science (RIS) freshman seminar course;
  • Participants will experience the key RIS activity of analyzing a Big Question in STEM research;
  • Participants will be able to describe current evaluation data on the effectiveness of freshmen seminars like RIS.
5:40pm - 6:20pm
Using an FYE to Introduce the Active Learning Classroom
Severn
Abstract:
Sierra Nevada College faculty have redesigned the First Year Experience (FYE) course to introduce students to the active learning classroom. This presentation will describe the design process and the innovative techniques used in this class, which will be valuable to any faculty member looking to design a course utilizing team-based learning or problem-based learning. It will also be helpful to any institutions looking at redesigning the FYE to better introduce the institutional culture through learning communities.

Objectives:
Participants will leave with:
  • An understanding of design thinking;
  • Ideas for how to make the best use of a first year experience course;
  • Tips for taking the risk on an innovative pedagogical technique.

Friday

Time
8:20am - 8:40am
Building a Collaborative Learning Inter-Professional Experience for Graduate Students
Ballroom
Abstract:
Online education provides rich opportunities for graduate students to grow in vibrant, collaborative learning communities. The ability to be an effective strategic planner is vital within healthcare. Online -strategic planning can be taught in a simulated, real world environment. Each student writes a strategic plan during the semester-writing one chapter weekly. Students provide feedback to each other. Instructors facilitate dialogue. Process is iterative. A feedback loop is created. Feedback is incorporated into the final document which is submitted for grading. Session participants will engage in a simulated exercise to learn about the student experience.

Objectives:
  • Describe how to develop a collaborative learning environment online;
  • Identify the value of an inter-professional learning environment;
  • List and describe strategies for engaging students.
8:20am - 8:40am
Does Prior Clinical Experience Predict Success in Graduate Nursing Programs?
Ballroom
Abstract:
Whether or not prior clinical experience is essential for success in advanced practice graduate nursing programs is highly debated. There is limited evidence on whether prior clinical experience is predictive of academic success in these programs. One hundred and thirty-seven MSN students' admission data from GWU are retrospectively being examined for the presence of clinical work prior to matriculation. The objective is to learn whether or not clinical experience is predictive of academic success in this sample and begin the discussion among faculty regarding the utility of using prior clinical experience as an admission criterion.

Objectives:
  • The learner will be able to state which admission criteria are currently used to admit students into graduate nursing programs;
  • The learner will begin to consider the utility of using past clinical experience in predicting success in graduate nursing programs by learning the results of our study conducted at George Washington University's School of Nursing;
  • The learner will evaluate whether or not graduate nursing admission committees should use prior clinical experience as an admission criterion in graduate nursing programs and explore future research on this topic;
  • The learners from other health science disciplines will consider what their admissions criteria are and whether or not they are evidence based.
8:20am - 8:40am
Examining Learning Outcomes for Research/Back-Channel Response/Critical-Thinking Using Twitter
Ballroom
Abstract:
Social media permeates students' communication practices and offers instructors opportunities for innovation in classroom practices. Social media affords students immediate access to academic scholars, industry professionals, and current information about almost any topic, but challenges teachers to examine previous assumptions about how learning and information access is accomplished in today's classroom environments. Indeed, social media's immediacy requires students to think critically and ethically about their information sources and usage of public data. This round-table explores the classroom use of Twitter to engage students in new ways of researching topics, joining/creating communities of learners, responding to classroom lectures, and thinking critically.

Objectives:
  • Provide real classroom examples of students using Twitter for research, including student activities related to connecting to communities of activists/journalists/citizens concerned with international/national social issues;
  • Introduce tools related to Twitter (HootSuite, Tweetdeck, Geofedia, Trendsmap, etc.) and provide examples of their usage in the classroom for student engagement and critical thinking;
  • Provide real classroom video/examples of using Twitter as a back-channel tool for gathering immediate student feedback to classroom lectures, as well as a student peer-response tool;
  • Discuss with attendees how they can incorporate Twitter in their own classes, how Twitter can aid in teaching/learning, and how Twitter can increase student interaction, support, and community building.
8:20am - 8:40am
Group Dynamics and the Creative Process
Ballroom
Abstract:
When the final project for a course is also a magazine published and distributed as a university marketing tool, Design & Merchandising faculty devised a teaching process that promoted individual creativity and a collective goal. The annual challenge is to have each student achieve high quality individual work that mirrors and complements the group's vision for the end product as well as please multiple clients. To achieve this goal, in the first of two consecutive terms, students literally "sign off" on content and design decisions that result from an enthusiastic, collaborative and iterative classroom process. In addition, the faculty aims to have the class align with the Design & Merchandising "Required and Desired" skills identified by the program faculty. Throughout the process of devising, developing and designing the magazine, leadership, teamwork, negotiation and effective communication skills are gained in a supportive and lively classroom environment.

Objectives:
  • Explore classroom strategies for achieving individual excellence and group success;
  • Introduce outcomes-based learning that meets academic program skills requirements;
  • Explore parallels between group process in the classroom and in highly regarded corporate environments.
Nick Cassway
8:20am - 8:40am
I Flipped My Class: What Did My Students and I Learn in the Process?
Ballroom
Abstract:
There has been a lot of buzz in higher education over the past year about the flipped classroom model for teaching and learning. The flipped model focuses on in-class content application with faculty guidance; content delivery, assisted by technology, occurs out-of-class. The active learning process constitutes the core of the flipped classroom and its effectiveness depends on active student learning and preparation for such learning. This roundtable provides a forum for discussion of lessons learned regarding the instructional design and implementation process, guided by Fink's framework (2003) and facilitates sharing of best practice across disciplines. Resources will be distributed.

Objectives:
Participants will:
  • Deepen their understanding of the purpose, instructional design, and implementation process of the flipped classroom approach;
  • Apply Fink's instructional design process to flipped class design;
  • Share examples of flipped classroom experiences both from the instructor's and students' perspectives: what worked well? What did not work so well? How? Why?;
  • Reflect on their instructional design and implementation process and start to consider ways to enrich their own teaching;
  • Obtain a set of resources.
Gabriele Bauer
8:20am - 8:40am
Strengthening Racial Identity for Improved Learning Outcomes
Ballroom
Abstract:
This presentation will identify constructs and behaviors conducive to successful learning outcomes among African American male college students. Results based on preliminary research on strengthening Racial Identity via role modeling and increasing awareness of behaviors related to academic success with the Start-Stop-Continue model will be shared. Participants can expect to learn how to implement the Start-Stop-Continue Model as well as enhancing their ability to increase student behaviors related to academic success.

Objectives:
  • Explore how contextual factors such as racial identity impact academic success;
  • Briefly present scholarship builds on earlier thinking about benefits of racial identity and role modeling on academic success;
  • Share a transferrable framework that (1) increases awareness of behaviors which should be started, stopped, continued (2) engages those behaviors related to academic success (3) provides quick feedback and (4) initiates change among students;
  • Expand participants' ability to consider racial identity/ethnic identity when teaching core courses;
  • Enrich participants' repertoire of approaches to help students achieve academic success.
8:20am - 8:40am
The Case of the Disengaged Students: Motivating Learners through Evidence-Based Teaching
Ballroom
Abstract:
They sat there, sullen and inert, while everyone else spoke animatedly and substantively within their groups. Whenever we discussed a concept, an assignment, or a program, these two invariably replied, "That's so stupid!" Though I am usually a great favorite of students, these two individuals rejected everything associated with me and apparently with college. They needed intervention. Delving into disciplines as diverse as cognitive science, business, the legal profession, and pop culture, I intensified my approach. The result? Definite improvement. This Round-Table presents proactive strategies to engage all students.

Objectives:
  • To reject unproductive teaching approaches;
  • To describe the realities of contemporary student culture and why;
  • To offer proactive, high-interest teaching solutions based on solid principles and practices of business, law, psychology, and cognitive science.
Karen Schramm
9:00am - 9:40am
Addressing Student Resistance to Video Critique in Public Speaking Courses
Potomac
Abstract:
When students in a face-to-face Public Speaking course resisted using the rich-media options for their online critiques of their classmates' recorded speeches, the instructor wanted to find out why and to discover ways to overcome that resistance. Based upon findings from an article called "Student Perceptions of Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication in Face-to-Face Courses" and the results of interviews with the resistant students, the instructor proposes to apply aspects of Wiggins and McTighe's "WHERE" approach to assessment for the redesign of key assignments. Participants will be asked to evaluate which approaches look to be most fruitful.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn that students prefer submitting written critiques of peers' speeches rather than audio or video critique;
  • Participants will examine the reasoning behind students' preferences;
  • Participants will assess the costs and benefits of written communication vs. rich media communication in an online environment from both the students' and the instructor's perspectives;
  • Participants will evaluate various adjustments to assignment design intended to address student resistance to video critique in a public speaking course.
Tim McGee
9:00am - 9:40am
Designing Courses to Increase Student Engagement and Motivation
Congressional
Abstract:
In this session, the presenter discusses his own success in redesigning an introductory philosophy course to increase students' intellectual engagement and internal motivation. Using ideas from cognitive scientists as a guide to course design, the presenter has discovered that student engagement and motivation can be greatly increased by focusing not on the question, What do students need to know?, but on the question, What should students be able to do? The results of an extensive cross-section survey will also be presented.

Objectives:
After this presentation, participants will be able to:
  • Understand how course design might improve student engagement and internal motivation;
  • Understand ways in which cognitive science might be used to improve course design;
  • Learn ways to improve their own course design to increase student engagement and internal motivation.
Stephen Finn
9:00am - 9:40am
Designing an American Sign Language Composition Course
Patuxent
Abstract:
Gallaudet University is a bilingual university that uses American Sign Language (ASL) and written English as our languages of instruction. ASL. As an institution we are tasked with improving students academic English and ASL. A first year general studies course was redesigned to become an ASL composition course. This required the articulation of a composition pedagogy to be used with a language that does not have a written form and to tackle challenges that a language that does not have a written form bring. How give feedback on a video? How does a student produce drafts of an assignment? Are there any frozen academic text that can be used as models for students? It also demonstrated how technology can be used in unexpected ways to resolve some of these issues as well as engage students to want to improve their ASL composition skills.

Objectives:
  • Expose participants to the challenges of teaching composition in a language that does not have a written form;
  • Engage in a discussion, generate ideas for teaching composition of a signed language;
  • Demonstrate how technology can be harnessed in creative ways to mitigate teaching composition that does not have a written form.
9:00am - 9:40am
Evaluating Multimedia Online Pedagogy: Barriers and Benefits
Embassy
Abstract:
Online courses using multimedia resources compel and enrich the overall learning experience, but reliably accessing those materials has proven difficult. The Rehabilitation Act and the American With Disability Act are clear - digital content must be receivable to all human senses dependent on student's needs, regardless of where this content resides.
9:00am - 9:20am
Fixing the Mismatch between Assessment Tools & Student Achievement Thresholds
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Graduating-senior data suggested that some were still not being coherent in papers and presentations. Faculty disagreed about why some texts seemed coherent. But in this age of institutional assessment and accreditation accountability, "I know it when I see it" isn't good enough. We wondered, "what is (Bennett 2012)" going on in these texts? And when there is a mismatch between crucial threshold concepts (Meyer and Land 2006) and "what is" being promoted via our assessment tools—what then? This presentation is a summary of a SoTL study of the coherence strategies of a bilingual student--how she accomplished coherence, with and despite the assignment checklists and Institutional Rubrics, which participants will have an opportunity to unpack and discuss.

Objectives:
  • Considering mine, your own, and others’ assessment tools, participants will see that our assessment tools (from our Institutional Assessments to the checklists and rubrics we make for assignments) often to not assess what is at the very heart of what we want our students to learn.
  • By analyzing assessment tools, both at the institutional level and at the assignment level, participants will consider ways to fix the miss-match between what IS crucial for success on an assignment and what it is the assessment tools SAY is crucial.
  • Participants will see how one student managed her thesis statements quite well—despite the assignments, rubrics and checklists that variously highlighted (on did not) the importance of those thesis statements.
Kathleen Wood
9:00am - 10:40am
Maximizing Learning via Group Work: Putting Research into Practice
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
Group work is a powerful way to increase student learning of content while also assisting students with developing important interpersonal skills they will need in the workplace. However, developing effective group activities and monitoring group progress are challenging tasks. During this extremely interactive workshop, participants will review research findings on effective group strategies, discovering ways to improve group work in their classes. Topics such as group assignment (self-selection vs. assigned groups), evenly distributed work load (avoiding social loafing), and of course grading (individual, group, combination approach) will be discussed.

Objectives:
Participants will be able to:
  • Discuss findings from research studies on how active learning and group activities can improve student learning;
  • Identify and implement effective strategies to increase student productivity and learning during group work;
  • Describe several effective group activities that can be easily implemented.
9:00am - 9:40am
Meaningful Field Experiences: Better Collaboration for Better Experiences
Severn
Abstract:
Field experiences, a component of teacher education programs, focus on the skill development of the pre-service teacher. While children may benefit from this additional attention and instruction, teacher education field experiences are not designed with that in mind. Field experiences in special education classroom settings can be particularly problematic. In this presentation, the need for more clearly structured field experiences will be discussed and a partnership between university and local intermediate unit personnel will be detailed, with particular emphasis on how required field experiences have been developed to benefit both the pre-service teacher and the exceptional child.

Objectives:
Participants will:
  • Learn about the limitations inherent in current teacher education program field experiences, particularly those that are specific to those required to be special education settings;
  • Gain information on how a collaborative relationship between university faculty and local intermediate unit personnel has been developed to better address the structure of required pre-service teacher education field experiences in special education classroom settings designed for children with behavioral and emotional disorders;
  • Learn about research effeorts embedded within the field experience program and how data obtained may translate into improved transition practices for children with behavioral and emotional disorders.
9:00am - 10:40am
TBD
Ambassador
Joanne Munroe
9:00am - 9:40am
Writing Success and Self Efficacy: The Student Perspective
Diplomat
Abstract:
This research sought to understand how teacher practices impact developmental writing students' ability to interpret and respond to peer and teacher feedback, their use of secondary support systems, such as the writing center, how these things impact the revision process, and how their learning experience influences both student writing and self-efficacy. The results suggested that without foundational knowledge and modeling, feedback was cursory and unproductive, leaving students unable to make meaningful revisions to essays. This, to some extent, led to minimal learning, low self-efficacy and fear of writing.

Objectives:
  • Participants will actively assess primary and secondary student learning goals in curriculum and lesson planning;
  • Participants will utilize modeling, a key element of social cognitive theory, in order to engage and empower student success;
  • Participants will utilize peer workshops that yield higher level thinking skills and elicit curiosity and motivation through dialogue;
  • Participants will offer students quality feedback that will culminate in substantial revisions rather than simply lower-order corrections;
  • Participants will assign research and writing assignments that reflect students' interest and natural curiosity.
Diane Halm
9:25am - 9:45am
New Thinking in Foundations: What's in a First-Year Toolbox?
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Contemplating changing ideas about what constitutes knowledge (Prensky) we rethink what students need to learn. This presentation will focus on the "toolbox" of basic skills that makes up foundation year curriculum using the example of college art programs. I will describe the historical circumstances from which the idea of "foundational" knowledge emerges. Then look at contemporary philosophical critiques of a priori or foundational knowledge-belief in underlying, stable truths-by critics like Judith Butler who discusses the performative nature of identity. I will share an example of a hybrid English writing/studio foundations course as one way of addressing these questions.

Objectives:
  • Participants will share ideas about ways to connect new thinking in what constitutes knowledge, specifically focused ideas about critical thinking and dispositions toward learning as it relates to the arts and "cultural production";
  • Participants will be introduced to new thinking about what could be in the "toolbox" of basic skills that students learn in their first year;
  • Participants will learn about the historical development of traditional first year curricula;
  • Participants will examine contemporary philosophical critiques of what is considered foundations or a priori knowledge.
Mariah Doren
10:00am - 10:20am
Evidence-Based Teaching and Learning
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Group take-home exams provide high-impact, authentic experiences that foster meaningful application of skills and knowledge, student participation, teamwork, and critical thinking. I use these exams for students to learn and apply real-world skills and as a means to assess critical thinking and other learning outcomes. I will report indirect and direct measures of student learning from data gathered during five semesters of group take-home exams. You will learn how to prepare assignments that target fundamentals and build competency, design exams that embody authentic tasks, employ group exam "contracts" to facilitate group dynamics, and anticipate pitfalls.

Objectives:
Attendees will learn:
  • How to best prepare students and set policies for group take-home exams;
  • How to frame questionnaire prompts to gauge student attitudes and skills;
  • How to construct a group contract for take-home exams;
  • Tips for success for group take-home exams.
Carol Anelli
10:00am - 10:40am
Group Mentoring of New Faculty: A Model for Classroom Practice
Embassy
Abstract:
Higher education faculty members often have limited training or experience in group facilitation. A successful five year faculty mentoring program at a mid-size state university provided a dual-approach to mentoring which included both one-on-one mentoring and group mentoring. New faculty and senior faculty participants alike participated in group sessions and came to appreciate the value of learning in a carefully developed cohesive group. This session will focus on how faculty from across disciplines can make use of similar activities to form more supportive and positive classroom learning environments.

Objectives:
  • To provide an overview of how group work principles can be used to form a more positive and supportive learning environment for faculty and students;
  • To identify the benefits of creating a cohesive group for faculty and students' learning;
  • To provide sample tasks for developing a more cohesive group experience.
10:00am - 10:40am
Impact of a Creative and Collaborative Laboratory Activity on First-Year STEM Students
Potomac
Abstract:
The first-year student chemistry laboratory experience has changed dramatically over the past five years from primarily verification-based experiments to those with a focus on guided-inquiry learning along with the use of modern instrumentation, group-work, and written laboratory reports. As we look forward to Miami University’s new 2020 plan, a unifying goal is “learning and discovery,” promoting a vibrant environment that produces extraordinary student outcomes. While the changes in our first-year student lab courses are steps in the right direction, the researchers wished to continue to improve the students’ engaged undergraduate experience. In this session we will address the impact of a new, creative, and collaborative laboratory activity from the student perspective.

Objectives:
  • Learn about changes made to first-year lab courses to increase student-centeredness;
  • Consider how a collaborative lab activity can encourage student engagement;
  • Identify ways to promote ‘learning and discovery’ in STEM courses;
Yasmin Jessa
10:00am - 10:40am
Implementing Freshman Learning Communities to Foster Retention, Progression, and Graduation
Patuxent
Abstract:
In today's college environment, connectedness to the university is essential for first-year students. Freshman Learning Communities afford students opportunities to participate and to gain a sense of belonging at the university. When Learning Communities are implemented, students are provided with tools to help establish themselves at the university and to explore available options. The following aspects of Learning Communities will be covered in relationship to equipping students for college and career paths: group dynamics, individual learning preferences, faculty collaboration factors, and student services. Participants will gain skills of how to implement and maintain effective learning communities where students thrive.

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
  • Utilize learning preference instruments to identify individual learning preferences of their students;
  • Identify and adopt effective collaborative skills and strategies for student success;
  • Enlighten students on how to access resources from support services for college success.
10:00am - 10:40am
Improving Learning by Having Students Conduct Online Research to Prepare for Class
Severn
Abstract:
This presentation reports a new method of student preparation for class. In lieu of quizzes on assigned readings, students respond to 2-3 short answer questions. The questions require students to conduct research on the most important topics of the upcoming class session. Leveraging psychology theory, this method is predicted to improve learning, research/writing skills, and participation as students likely view information that they research as more relevant than information given to them. Assessment data indicate that although there were only slight improvements in class performance, students found the method to be more interesting, relevant, and enjoyable than more traditional methods.

Objectives:

Attendees will learn

  • About a research-based technique for having students prepare for class;
  • How this technique is more amenable to millennials' preferred learning method than traditional techniques;
  • How this technique benefitted student learning and engagement.
10:00am - 10:40am
Meeting the Millennials Where They Live: Using Social Networking Websites in the Traditional University Classroom
Congressional
Abstract:
This presentation will introduce a social networking website that has been developed to build and foster a learning community inside the traditional university classroom and beyond. Through this case study, participants will develop a better understanding of the potential of social media technologies as teaching tools, particularly as they apply to the lives of today's tech-savvy Millennial generation. The case study specifically sheds light on how students perceive the educational benefits and drawbacks to the use of the site in their classroom, based on online survey and discussion data collected each semester since the website's debut in fall 2009.

Objectives:
Participants will gain an understanding of:
  • The functionality and uses of a social networking website in the university classroom;
  • The potential of a social networking website as a teaching and community building tool, as well as a course management system;
  • Ways in which students experienced the use of the website and perceived its educational benefits/drawbacks inside and outside their classroom.
Sandy Nichols
10:00am - 10:40am
Telling Stories
Diplomat
Abstract:
The core principles of teaching for long-term learning or "Sticky Teaching" 1 revolve around the same principles writers and journalists use to turn any given topic into a compelling story. Come join a team of a professional journalist and a faculty developer for an interactive session about storytelling and how you can transform your lessons into compelling and memorable stories. 1Heath, C. and Heath, D. Made to Stick: why some ideas die and other survive. 2007. Random House Publishing, Inc. NY

Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to describe the components of a good story and how those components can be used in teaching;
  • Participants will be able to develop a story and use the story structure to teach a concept for their own classroom;
  • Participants will be able to describe how the components of teaching for long-term learning or "sticky teaching" and creating a good story overlap.
10:25am - 10:45am
Critical Thinking as Defamiliarization: Studying the Bible in a Liberal Arts Curriculum
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Student preconceptions about the Bible—especially beliefs about the appropriateness of critical examination of biblical texts???comprise a significant obstacle to studying the Bible as part of a liberal arts curriculum. Unlike prior knowledge, which can serve as an entre to the course subject matter, preconceptions can hinder free inquiry into biblical texts. Defamiliarization, or the representation of the familiar in an unfamiliar way so that the commonplace is perceived anew, challenges student preconceptions about the Bible while also promoting a critical, evidence-based method of interpreting biblical texts.

Objectives:
  • Participants should be able to identify some preconceptions students bring to the study of the Bible as part of a liberal arts curriculum;
  • Participants should be able to describe defamiliarization as a strategy for addressing student preconceptions regarding the study of the Bible as part of a liberal arts curriculum;
  • Participants should be able to combine defamiliarization and critical thinking as an evidence-based methodology for studying the Bible as part of a liberal arts curriculum.
Stephen Dawson
11:00am - 12:00pm
Are You Flipping Engaged? (What to Do with All That Class Time?)
Congressional
Abstract:
When most people think about flipping their course, they start by focusing on making or finding videos for their students to watch. That can be an important part of the process, but it's not the most important. If you get all that content out of your class, what will you do with the time you free up? In this session, we will think about the flipped classroom as composed of three elements: pre-class content engagement, preparation accountability, and classroom application exercises. We will focus specifically on how to create effective application exercises that give students skill practice in your discipline.

Objectives:
Participants will be able to apply to their courses:
  • Skill-based goals for their flipped course;
  • A schema for implementing a flipped course design;
  • The"4S" activity design technique adapted from Team-Based Learning's for the flipped classroom (with several modeled examples);
  • Useful techniques for activity design for the flipped classroom from the experiences of other participants.
11:00am - 11:20am
How to Adopt a Studio Arts Approach to Interdisciplinary Learning
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Learn the secrets of active learning that studio art instructors have known for centuries. Adopt this interdisciplinary approach to foster critical thinking, inquiry and experimentation. At the center of this approach are one-on-one interactions and real-time assessments that cultivate introspection and aid in revisions. See how critique sessions modeled on the artistic paradigm help students engage in group learning, and problem-solving activities that replicate real-world environs in every discipline.

Objectives:
  • See how you can apply a student-centered approach to learning that has guaranteed success;
  • Learn how one-on-one interactions and real-time assessments encourage introspection and revisions;
  • Discover the power of "critique session" that engage students in problem-solving activities and real-world environs.
Amy Stevens
11:00am - 12:00pm
Integrating Cultural Competence into a Professional Doctoral Health Science Curriculum
Severn
Abstract:
In 2008, the Department of Nursing at the University of Michigan-Flint developed a new Doctor of Nursing Practice program using evidence-based cultural competence as a major thread throughout the graduate curriculum. Transcultural-certified nursing faculty mentored academic peers toward integrating cultural competence into their courses. At three junctures during their education, students were assessed using the Nursing Self-Efficacy Tool (Jeffreys, 2010) to determine the level of confidence regarding their knowledge and ability to provide culturally competent care among diverse populations. Using paired t-tests, a statistically significant improvement in overall score of 27.8% exceeded the goal of 25% for improvement.

Objectives:
  • Participants will describe importance of cultural competence in professional doctoral level health science curriculum in the 21st Century;
  • Participants will be able to analyze a professional doctoral level health science curriculum for cultural competence content;
  • Participants will be able to discuss cultural competence in a professional doctoral level health science curriculum survey results;
  • Participant will design strategies to increase cultural competence content in a professional doctoral level health science curriculum.
11:00am - 12:00pm
Meeting Your Students as Learners: First Day of Class Activity
Ambassador
Abstract:
This interactive workshop will provide a brief overview of the research on the first day of class and the research on the importance of student-instructor rapport for learning. Attendees will participate in a first-day-of-class activity designed to (a) get to know students, (b) encourage students to think of themselves as learners, and (c) introduce students to the course. Students select a photo representing themselves as learners and write an explanation of how the image reflects them as learners. Attendees will leave with detailed instructions to replicate the activity and ways of adapting and extending the activity for their own courses.

Objectives:
  • Attendees will be able to summarize research findings about (a) effective techniques to use on the first day of class and (b) the importance of student-instructor relationships to learning;
  • Attendees will be able to facilitate a first day of class activity designed to (a) get to know students, (b) encourage students to think of themselves as learners, and (c) introduce students to the course;
  • Attendees will be able to identify specific ways of adapting and extending this activity for use in their own courses.
11:00am - 12:00pm
Numeracy from Practice to Theory: Using Interactive Case Studies
Potomac
Abstract:
Numeracy "the skill to use and understand numbers in everyday contexts" is a key learning outcome in higher education. However, rates of adult numeracy in the U.S. trail nearly every developed country, suggesting a need to better connect mathematics education with the concrete situations of an increasingly data-saturated world. We present a pedagogical approach to numeracy using "interactive case studies," in which data and visualizations drawn from authentic examples may be manipulated interactively with technology to explore the effects of changing conditions and illustrate underlying concepts. Free tools and resources for using and creating interactive case studies are also provided.

Objectives:
  • Compare and contrast mathematics with numeracy (or mathematical literacy);
  • Contrast the manners in which traditional and numeracy-focused pedagogies scaffold abstract and concrete reasoning skills;
  • Use an "interactive case study" to explore both concrete and abstract problems related to numeracy concepts;
  • Identify free tools and resources for using or creating interactive numeracy case studies.
11:00am - 12:00pm
Teaching Race and Diversity: Social Identity and Student Perceptions
Patuxent
Abstract:
How do we bridge the distances between white teachers and students of color as well as between teachers of color and white students, in order to fulfill our primary purpose of effective pedagogy in the race and diversity classes that we teach? This self-reflective workshop addresses this question and asks faculty in attendance to turn the interrogation onto the self as educator. We propose to raise questions about teaching and learning and make suggestions for bridging the divide. We will discuss individual stereotyping, social identities, specific pedagogies, and instructional methods that support the challenges that faculty of diverse backgrounds face.

Objectives:
  • To examine our own race, class, ethnicity, and gender privileges and non-privileges;
  • To examine how students of diverse backgrounds see us and how they might respond to our social identities;
  • To develop pedagogical strategies that allow students of different backgrounds to move beyond their stereotypes of us.
11:00am - 12:00pm
Teaching Students How to Fish: Empowering Self-Sufficient Learners
Diplomat
Abstract:
If you teach a student content, they may learn; but if you show them how to learn, you will have provided them with the skills to learn for the rest of their lives. In this highly interactive workshop we will imagine how to use evidence-based teaching practices as a means of enabling students to take agency and accountability for their learning. Join us if you would like to discover how to become a partner with your students in the teaching and learning process!

Objectives:
After participating in this session participants will:
  • Value the opportunity teachers have to teach learners how to learn;
  • Identify practical strategies for empowering student self-directed learners;
  • Come to see themselves as a having the power to teach students how to learn;
  • Create a plan for teaching students how to learn in their courses.
Carl Moore
11:00am - 12:00pm
Transitioning from Head to Heart: The Power of a Reflective Journal
Embassy
Abstract:
Deep learning is personal learning. It is the connection learners make when new information is captured cognitively in our head through study and personal preparation and then internalized in the heart through pondering and proving. A reflective journal is a powerful tool for transitioning new information from the head to the heart by proving a platform to capture personal insight and meaning. Once in heart, the student gains ownership in new information where they can begin to make deeper connections from previous learning. The heart therefore acts a repository waiting for the next wave of new insight for deeper learning.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn techniques in motivating student to come to class prepared;
  • Participants will discover methods for helping students capture personal insight;
  • Participants will acquire practices in creating a meaningful reflect journal;
  • Participant will realize skill in assessing reflective journals .
Mark Orchard
11:00am - 12:00pm
Universal Design for Learning Strategies for Transforming Face-to-Face Courses to Hybrid or Fully-Online Courses
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
This session will present strategies for transforming face-to-face courses to hybrid or fully online courses based on the principles Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and the Quality Matters Rubric (QM). The Quality Matters Rubric is a set of research based "general and specific standards used to evaluate the design of online and blended courses" (Quality Matters, 2011, para.1). Universal Design for Learning is a set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn (Rose, Meyer, Strangman & Rappolt, 2002; CAST 2011). Online course design is optimally facilitated by the conjunction of QM and UDL principles.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn summary information related to online teaching and learning about Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and the Quality Matters Guidelines (QM);
  • Based on tenants of UDL and QM, participants in this session will receive and share design and implementation strategies for transitioning face-to -face courses to blended (combination of hybrid of face to face) or fully online courses;
  • Session attendees will receive resources for designing an online course/course module to a model online course site, including electronic resources that facilitate the incorporation of UDL and QM in online course design.
11:30am - 11:50am
Engaging Students in Classroom Discussion Using a Student Engagement Technique
Susquehanna
Abstract:
A lesson plan based on the Student Engagement Technique - Role Play from Elizabeth Barkley's book is explored in this presentation to support the following research question, What techniques or teaching strategies engage students in a rich and informative classroom discussion? This technique is used to engage class discussion on Media and Politics. Students role play Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein interviewing Richard Nixon.

Objectives:
  • Explore challenges or obstacles to classroom discussion;
  • Explore various teaching techniques to engage a class;
  • Effectively employ engagement techniques in class to enhance classroom discussion.
12:45pm - 1:45pm
Plenary Presentation: College Teaching: Myths, Evaluation, Improvement
Ballroom
Abstract:
No group is more full of myths about college teaching than college teachers, themselves. This session will address three such widely believed “truths”. It will also look at changing practices in evaluating teaching and will compare practices used in 1984 with practices used today, some thirty years later. Surprising and important changes found in the presenter’s nationwide research will be highlighted. Lastly, the session will examine characteristics of effective teachers and will take a close look at what separates great teachers from those that are just good.

Methodology:
The presentation relies on an active learning approach and includes short lectures, individual reflection, small and large group discussion / problem solving and Q & A.

Objectives:
Participants will learn:
  • Three widely believed myths about college teaching;
  • How evaluation of teaching today differ from approaches used earlier;
  • What great teachers do that good teachers do not
Peter Seldin
2:00pm - 3:00pm
Best Practices in Classroom Peer Review
Congressional
Abstract:
Classroom peer review benefits students, who learn both from the feedback they receive and the feedback they give. Peer review can be done either face to face, or over an electronic peer-review system. In either format, peer review works best when a good rubric is used. Students should have a chance to gain competence in using the rubric; often, some sort of "calibration" is used, where students practice assessing a work that has been pre-assessed by experts. To ensure good reviews, authors can comment on the helpfulness of reviews they received. Or a third party can assess these reviews.

Objectives:
  • To introduce the audience to the benefits of peer review of student work;
  • To highlight the importance of a good rubric, and offer suggestions on how to create one;
  • To discuss different quality-control mechanisms for ensuring careful reviews ;
  • To differentiate formative from summative peer review, and compare the challenges of each;
  • To present and compare several online applications for peer review.
2:00pm - 4:20pm
Craft(y) Faculty Development Workshops: Teachers as Learners
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
The best programs for keeping teaching and learning fresh and engaging bring a mix of junior, mid-career, and senior faculty with diverse needs and experiences to the same table to learn from each other. We will introduce participants to a well-tested strategy to spark creative engagements and to build learning communities among faculty and staff (The Great Craft Workshop). Furthermore, the lessons faculty learn about themselves as learners and as teachers are easily adapted to classroom use.

Objectives:
  • Building Faculty Learning Communities focused on Teaching;
  • Demonstrating the Usefulness of Reflection, Sharing, and Community Building;
  • Creating Mentor Relationships.
2:00pm - 3:00pm
Creating Learning-Centered New Faculty Orientations: Keeping them Awake and Motivated
Diplomat
Abstract:
Offering a learning centered new faculty orientation (NFO) is one of the most powerful ways a university can effectively engage new faculty and secure their organizational identification. Unfortunately, many traditional NFOs do not model the learning centered philosophy and miss the opportunity to establish a collaborative and celebratory tone. This upbeat session will invite participants to co-create the ideal NFO while considering how to embed technology into NFO. This learning centered simulation-based session will leave participants with programming instruments, concrete ideas to augment a NFO (e.g., sample NFO agendas, tools, activities), and pathways to continue networking with fellow audience members.

Objectives:
  • To give audience members the opportunity to collectively exchange NFO programming best practices;
  • To model community building, networking, and collaborative strategies for NFOs & teaching in the classroom;
  • To leave with at least 3 concrete ways to modify a NFO program.
2:00pm - 3:00pm
Experiential Learning Cycle: A Catalyst to Jump Start Student Reflection
Ambassador
Abstract:
This dynamic session examines "minds on" teaching by focusing on key features of Kolb's Experiential Learning Cycle within the context of service learning. The ELC is a powerful tool for engaging students and creating high impact learning experiences for students. Participants will learn how academic programs use the ELC to enhance community partnerships to bridge the divide between "theory and practice." Participants will learn facilitation techniques to develop students' reflective practices to generate, deepen, and document the students' own learning (Ash & Clayton, 2009). Participants will receive implementation tools to apply the ELC to their own teaching.

Objectives:
  • Participants will consider the Experiential Learning Cycle (Kolb, 1984) as one construct for implementing experiential learning in the college classroom;
  • Participants will learn about how one type of experiential learning, service-learning, creates collaborative college and community partnerships. Service learning bridges the theory/practice divide;
  • Participants will learn facilitation techniques to develop students' reflective practices in order to help them generate, deepen, and document their own learning (Ash & Clayton, 2009);
  • Participants will examine concrete examples, receive tools for implementation and have the opportunity to seek collegial feedback about ways to apply the Experiential Learning Cycle in their own courses.
2:00pm - 2:20pm
Formal Faculty Mentoring: A Successful Program for Retaining Diverse Facutly
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Retention of international and minority faculty is an integral part of strategic planning for most universities today. Minority and international faculty were strongly attracted to a faculty mentoring program that combined one-on-one mentoring with group mentoring. Both one-on-one mentoring and group mentoring have been found to be beneficial to these two groups. Data from this five year faculty mentoring program demonstrates the differential benefits perceived by minority and international faculty who participated in this dual-approach mentoring program. When compared with new faculty who did not participate in this program, faculty participants from diverse groups were retained at 96%.versus 69% for non-participants.

Objectives:
  • To delineate the benefits of faculty mentoring for minority and international faculty;
  • To identify the different needs of international faculty versus minority faculty in terms of faculty mentoring;
  • To report retention data from a five year faculty mentoring program that positively impacted the retention of minority and international faculty.
2:00pm - 3:00pm
Implementing Universal Design for Learning: Concept and Model Development in a Faculty Learning Community
Patuxent
Abstract:
Presenters in this session will analyze and reflect on preliminary data from a faculty learning community (FLC) focused on the redesign and implementation of their courses using the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Four members of the 6-member FLC will introduce the study with a brief theoretical and literature review, provide background on UDL, chronicle and discuss the formation and maintenance of the UDL FLC, present analyzed data from the study, and engage the session participants in small group discussion about pedagogical modeling and concept development related to UDL as it was implemented by faculty members in a university instructional setting. The use of smart devices will be encouraged during this session.

Objectives:
  • Report preliminary findings from a faculty learning community study of the implementation of UDL principles;
  • Discuss the individual and group outcomes from course redesign and implementation;
  • Inquire into the possibility of a working model for UDL in college classrooms;
  • Connect study to conversations about pedagogical modeling and concept development or UDL for university faculty.
2:00pm - 3:00pm
SWI: An Authentic Research-Based Curriculum for Early Undergraduate STEM Education
Embassy
Abstract:
This session will describe the Small World Initiative, a program that uses an authentic, crowd sourced research project to create a new model for introductory science laboratory teaching and learning. Responding to recommendations in Engage to Excel and Vision and Change in Biology Education to improve student learning, engagement and retention in STEM disciplines, this project provides for authentic research experience early in a student's academic career. This initiative was piloted in the spring of 2014 by 25 institutions across the country. The materials produced, experience gained and data collected so far will be reviewed.

Objectives:
  • A rationale for implementing change in the way science is presented to undergraduate students;
  • A model for research based laboratory education ( Small World Initiative);
  • Student response to the Small World Initiative at two universities;
  • Access to freely available materials produced so far by the Small World Initiative;
  • An opportunity to brainstorm additional ways to introduce authentic research in STEM curricula.
2:00pm - 3:00pm
Unpacking Issues of Diversity in Online Courses: Leading Learners through a Journey of Change
Potomac
Abstract:
For college instructors who teach courses focused on issues of multiculturalism and diversity, particular attention needs to be given in creating a classroom climate of safety and acceptance, and utilizing teaching strategies that promote learners' development into culturally responsive, multicultural individuals. In this session, we present a teaching and learning framework for online courses focused on issues of multiculturalism that outlines three areas that are critical in helping learners go beyond a tacit understanding around issues of diversity: the learning climate, fostering transformation, and the learner's journey of change.

Objectives:
  • Attendees will be introduced to a teaching and learning framework for online courses that are focused on topics of multiculturalism and diversity;
  • Attendees will be introduced to instructional strategies in the development of the three core areas of the framework: learning climate, fostering learner reflectivity/challenging prior assumptions, and guiding learners on a journey of change into culturally responsive individuals;
  • Attendees will be introduced to theories and concepts that offer additional guidelines for developing an online course that focuses on learners' needs, supporting learners as they wrestle with issues of diversity/multiculturalism, and recognizing the critical role of instructors in modeling critical reflection and mentoring students.
2:00pm - 3:00pm
Using Technology to be Active & Collaborative: Even in Organic Chemistry!
Severn
Abstract:
The Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education by Chickering and Gamson stress active and collaborative learning, but this can seem difficult to implement in large STEM classes. This session will highlight ways to integrate the active and collaborative principles into large classes and discuss how technology can be used to meet the other principles as well. Taking advantage of easy-to-use and readily available technological solutions like Socrative and a variety of media outlets, students have improved test scores and report higher overall satisfaction in a class that is often students' least favorite—organic chemistry.

Objectives:
By the end of this session participants will be able to:
  • Recognize the Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education ;
  • Discuss the benefits of the Seven Principles;
  • Identify ways to use technology to create active and collaborative classes and address each of the Seven Principles.
2:30pm - 2:50pm
Emerging Teaching Sensibilities: Multi-Pronged Assessment of TA Development
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Teaching assistants (TAs) teach the majority of introductory lab courses at U.S. research universities. In response to calls for STEM education reform, inquiry-based teaching approaches have been adopted in lab classes to address declines in student interest and persistence. Consequently, preparing TAs to use these innovative approaches is urgent. We triangulate several data sources, including surveys, observations, and interviews to understand how TAs learn to use inquiry-based teaching approaches. Findings from this 2-semester study indicate this process is challenging: TAsNa have to reconcile long-standing beliefs about teaching while receiving conflicting feedback from their students and faculty mentors.

Objectives:
  • Improve understanding of the process of learning to teach science as inquiry;
  • Recognize differences in instructors' enactments of inquiry;
  • Share findings to support professional development for inquiry-based teaching;
  • Identify areas where instructors new to inquiry need more support.
3:20pm - 4:20pm
Building Lifelong Learning Attributes in First-Semester Students Using the Effective Lifelong Learning Inventory (ELLI)
Potomac
Abstract:
Students in a first-year college reading support course learn reading strategies and apply them in a paired environmental science course while at the same time building lifelong learning attributes. Half of the instruction targets concrete reading/learning strategies and skill development. The other half of instruction builds lifelong learning attributes through self-reflection, coaching, and goal setting/action planning. Outcomes of the project showed significant gains in the seven dimension of the Effective Lifelong Learning Inventory. A wide variety of activities were used to build student motivation and engagement. Course activities and assessments, student reactions, and learning outcomes will be presented.

Objectives:
  • Present the rationale for incorporating lifelong learning instruction;
  • Discuss the elements and organization of the approach;
  • Discuss student reactions and outcomes;
  • Discuss next steps and possible changes.
3:20pm - 4:20pm
Developing Metacognitive Skill to Teach Critical Reasoning
Embassy
Abstract:
While critical reasoning is a pedagogical objective for many of our assignments and courses, teaching these reasoning skills is beset by two obstacles. First, explicit instruction on critical reasoning does not provide students with the widely-applicable skill we intend to teach, but rather a course specific one. Second, students are subject to cognitive biases which impede reasoning, and which are difficult to address through traditional critical reasoning pedagogy. In this session, participants will explore how developing metacognitive skills addresses these concerns, how metacognitive skills can be effectively taught and how to apply this pedagogy to their own field.

Objectives:
  • Understand what metacognition is, and the evidence that it is essential to developing critical reasoning skills;
  • Understand pedagogical techniques designed to aid in the development of metacognitive skill;
  • Reflect on the struggles students face with critical reasoning by analyzing our own reasoning;
  • Develop a critical reasoning strategy for students which can be used to begin metacognition instruction;
  • Develop a checklist students can use when employing the reasoning strategy.
Jeffrey Maynes
3:20pm - 4:20pm
Lessons Learned from 'Flipping' an Introductory Course
Congressional
Abstract:
University instructors are increasingly encouraged to consider course "flipping", whereby students are first exposed to course content through homework assignments and subsequently apply this new knowledge during in-class activities. We made the decision to partially flip an introductory course when we applied for an Innovative Teaching Grant in support of course re-design. Having no prior experience with course flipping, we were excited and uncertain about its potential benefits for students. Our presentation describes the many lessons learned during our first semester of course flipping and their permanent impact on the final re-designed course.

Objectives:
By the end of our presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Identify aspects of a flipped-course approach that will have the greatest impact on instructional practice;
  • Describe how data from formative and summative evaluations can be used to enhance effectiveness of flipping a course;
  • Assess benefits and limitations of the inverted (flipped) classroom;
  • Describe strategies for overcoming student concerns about course flipping.
3:20pm - 4:20pm
Preparing Students to Manage High Risk Emotionally Charged Situations in Practice
Diplomat
Abstract:
Preparing students for professional practice requires knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are developed in the classroom environment as well as practice setting. Students must manage unanticipated, highly emotional situations, such as medical emergencies and volatile family relationships, in a rapid, effective, professional manner. We describe a series of innovative progressively complex learning experiences across a professional curriculum to prepare students for these uniquely challenging experiences. Methods include: didactic sessions, simulations, reflections, role-plays, video models, standardized patients, paper cases, and interprofessional practice sessions. These strategies allow for safe and authentic practice with varied feedback that appeals to multiple learning styles.

Objectives:
By the end of the session, the learner will be able to:
  • Design educational experiences to manage high risk emotionally charged professional situations;
  • Design curriculum that scaffolds learners' knowledge, skills, and attitudes to prepare them to manage high risk emotionally charged professional situations;;
  • Align the assessment of learners' competency with desired learning objectives.
3:20pm - 3:40pm
Problem-Based Learning in the Social Science Classroom
Susquehanna
Abstract:
There is ample evidence that "active learning" contributes to student engagement and learning. Classroom activities outside of the traditional lecture format are significant to active learning. Problem-based learning is one important vehicle for putting learning directly into the hands of students and building both students' core knowledge of the discipline and key skills for problem-solving that extend beyond the classroom. This work uses the presenter's experiences with problem-based learning in sociology to highlight the pedagogical benefits and challenges of this approach and to discuss practical problem construction.

Objectives:
Having attended this meeting session, conference participants will:
  • Understand the key characteristics of problem-based learning;
  • Recognize the benefits and challenges of using problem-based learning in a social science classroom;
  • Have a foundation for developing a plan to use problem-based learning in their own classrooms.
Daina Eglitis
3:20pm - 4:20pm
Team-Based Learning: An Experiential Introduction
Severn
Abstract:
Team-Based Learning (TBL) is an increasingly popular instructional strategy developed by Larry Michaelsen (Michaelsen, Knight & Fink, 2002). It involves four essential elements, proper team formation, the Readiness Assurance Process, high quality Application Activities, and accountability. TBL has demonstrated a variety of beneficial effects, including increased student engagement and improved academic performance. This session will provide an experiential introduction to TBL. That is, participants will: (a) be assigned to teams; (b) participate in a Readiness Assurance Process; and (c) complete several 4S Application Activities. These experiences will provide foundational knowledge, and demonstrate the 'engagingness' of TBL.

Objectives:
Upon completion of the session, participants will be able to:
  • List at least one similarity between Team-based Learning and a courtroom jury;
  • Recognize the essential elements of Team-based Learning, the stages of the Readiness Assurance Process, and the 4Ss of effective Application Activities;
  • Describe the rhythms of the typical Team-based Learning module;
  • Distinguish 4S Application Activities from other types of small group activities;
  • Develop at least one 4S Application Activity for their courses.
Karla Kubitz
3:20pm - 4:20pm
The Peak Performing Professor: A Practical Guide to Productivity and Happiness
Patuxent
Abstract:
The professoriate presents a dilemma, namely, how to complete the tasks of a tripartite job description which overwhelms and distracts many professors who then fail their students by not being intentional, open, and responsive in their teaching. The hardworking academic culture promotes patterns that may actually prevent professors from doing a good job. In this practical, interactive workshop, you will apply the four research-based practices used by the most successful and engaged academics so that you can better balance the role demands of good teaching, scholarship, and service while at the same time developing a satisfying personal life.

Objectives:
Participants will:
  • Reflect on performance challenges to effective teaching and faculty life;
  • Assess themselves on the four key practices (PACE) of the most successful and engaged academics;
  • Apply the PACE practices to their teaching and other faculty roles and responsibilities;
  • Develop a self-help plan for improving productivity and happiness which includes improved work habits and appropriate social accountability.
Susan Robison
3:20pm - 4:20pm
Use of Technology to Transform Brain-Based Teaching and Learning
Ambassador
Abstract:
Researchers have discovered that technology is changing students' brains both positively and negatively. At the same time, significant new discoveries in how the brain functions in the teaching and learning process when technology is used are creating news approaches to teaching. Indeed, regardless of their subject area, participants will become knowledgeable about how sleep, exercise, etc. impact brain-based teaching and learning in a technology-rich classroom environment. Participants will also take away from this session a better understanding of how technology is transforming brain-based teaching and learning, and how to foster greater student learning outcomes.

Objectives:
  • To discover how the brain changes behaviors and how it learns specific subjects in a technology-rich learning environment;
  • To understand the role of sleep, food, exercise in brain-based teaching and learning - a recipe for deep and lasting learning;
  • To apply strategies in creating a technology-rich classroom environment to improve student learning outcomes.
3:50pm - 4:10pm
Inquiry-Based Laboratory Pedagogy Across Scientific Disciplines
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Our investigation consists of an assessment of the impact of a pedagogical intervention facilitating scientific inquiry within five different laboratory-based courses and five different scientific disciplines. A quasi-experimental design is employed by utilizing different sections of the same courses as experimental and control groups. Control labs are conducted in the traditional expository manner, while experimental labs are focused on making testable hypotheses (an important step of inquiry based learning). Student outcomes assess the effect of this intervention on student learning of lab content and students' general attitudes toward science and inquiry-based learning.

Objectives:
  • Attendees will describe improvements in student learning of lab content when inquiry-based learning is implemented;
  • Attendees will describe improvement in students' general attitudes toward science, when inquiry-based learning is implemented;
  • Attendees will describe improvements in students' general attitudes toward inquiry-based learning, when inquiry-based learning is implemented.
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Assessing End-of-Semester Learning: Time Capsules, Class Resolutions, and Learning Summaries
Embassy
Abstract:
This session provides procedures and hands-on activities for three different learning experiences that assist in end-of semester assessment of learning outcomes. Time capsules, learning summaries, and class resolutions will be presented and modeled. These activities provide community-building and positive course closure and provide valuable data about what students have reported to learn throughout a semester. This session defines and offers examples of active learning modules that can be adapted and used across all disciplines. Note: This workshop would be best programmed on the last conference day so participants can summarize their own learning.

Objectives:
  • Cite a rationale for giving "closure" for students at the end of the semester;
  • Practice using assessment tools that actively engage students and provide valuable data;
  • Participate in three methods for assessing student learning using active learning techniques (time capsules, class resolutions, and learning summaries);
  • Gain facilitation guides for three closure/assessment techniques that can be used in any discipline ;
  • Brainstorm a variety of methods for modifying the three assessment strategies for blended and on-line learning environments.
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Building an Interdisciplinary Curriculum: Engaging Community to Create Opportunities and Provide Scaffolding
Diplomat
Abstract:
Interdisciplinary curricula in higher education are some of the most difficult to build. Considering academic departments as an archipelago of fiercely independent islands, how can we build an inter-island ferry system that welcomes and establishes connections, sharing, and the interweaving of cultures and peoples? In this plenary we will explore ways to engage community to encourage such efforts in higher education. We will discuss examples and approaches illustrating that building community across disciplines can enable a curricula of shared perspectives, content, faculty, and students.

Objectives:
At the end of this session you will be able to do the following with respect to an interdisciplinary curriculum:
  • Give a definition;
  • Describe 11 challenges to overcome;
  • Provide 5 recommendations for building and overcoming challenges;
  • Describe examples;
  • Describe resources and references.
Milt Cox
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Course Redesign: A Rocky Road Paved with Good Intentions
Severn
Abstract:
Course redesign employs a number of innovative teaching methods, including using technology to deliver lower levels of learning (knowledge, comprehension) and face to face classes for higher levels of learning (analysis, evaluation, synthesis). The road to a successful implementation of a blended course can be rocky, even with instructors experienced in blended learning. This session looks at both the costs and benefits of course redesign as implemented in an introductory business finance class. Participants will have an opportunity to share ideas and hopefully not repeat the mistakes made by the presenters.

Objectives:
  • Describe the redesign of an undergraduate finance class to a fully blended (hybrid) format);
  • Discuss the pitfalls of course redesign, including technology issues, student resistance, high set up costs;
  • Discuss the benefits of course redesign, including improved student learning, mimicking real world situations, creating lifelong learners.
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Ensuring Students Prepare So Class Time Focuses on Deep Learning
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
This session will describe (1) how we use the definitional grading system and class preparation assignments in undergraduate and graduate courses to ensure that students come to class prepared, (2) how we use active learning teaching strategies to leverage student preparation to produce highly interactive classes and deep learning, and (3) the different ways each of us needed to adjust to our own institution's needs in order to implement definitional grading effectively.

Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to design a definitional grading system using class preparation assignments to ensure students come to class prepared;
  • Participants will write a sample class preparation assignment;
  • Participants will be able to explain ways to avoid common pitfalls in using class preparation assignments;
  • Participants will be able to explain at least one way that their teaching methods will change when students come to class prepared.
4:30pm - 5:30pm
How Can Developing Online Courses Influence How Faculty Teach?
Potomac
Abstract:
For 15 years, GW has helped faculty develop online courses to teach in Summer Session, financing faculty development help with extra revenue earned by those summer courses. A recent survey shows clearly how this program has influenced those faculty members' subsequent teaching on campus in ten different ways. After summarizing findings and inviting the audience to consider whether to do parallel studies at their own institutions, the audience will be led in a discussion of which teaching improvement goals at their own institutions might be intentionally advanced in this way, and how.

Objectives:
  • Realize that the way faculty are helped to develop online courses can have distinct influences on how those same faculty teach on campus (not just the materials and tools they use but the ways they teach);
  • Brainstorm together about what teaching improvement targets can be best advanced by coordinating (a) how faculty are helped to develop online courses, (b) programs designed explicitly to improve campus teaching, and (c) other programs such as Assessment.
Stephen Ehrmann
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Learning through Advocacy: Course Assignments that Promote Community Change
Patuxent
Abstract:
Students who participate in advocacy activities as a part of course assignments may develop lifelong skills for advocating on behalf of themselves and others. This session will explore advocacy activities conducted with undergraduate students enrolled in public health and teacher education courses that may be adapted for undergraduate students in any discipline. Photovoice, a methodology for using photography to document community concerns, and letter writing will be discussed in-depth. Challenges in teaching advocacy and in encouraging students to become informed advocates will be shared in the context of evidence based approaches.

Objectives:
  • Participants will identify effective and meaningful advocacy activities for undergraduate students to engage with course material while advocating for a change on a course relevant topic of personal meaning;
  • Participants will articulate key content to include in lectures for undergraduate students learning about advocacy;
  • Participants will discuss challenges in guiding undergraduate students to become informed advocates;
  • Participants, based on the results of new and emerging research conducted by the presenter, will apply knowledge of how advocacy activities empower undergraduate students and encourage future acts of advocacy.
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Recycle, Reuse, and Remix: This Is Not the Next Best Thing
Congressional
Abstract:
Many of the promising practices currently suggested in higher education are similar to, if not based on time- tested 20th century educational theory. We use these theories at very deep, but not always conscious levels. In this fast-paced, fun presentation, participants explore practical, actionable ways to design classroom and program activities intentionally. Using a playfully selected top ten of the “greatest hits” or big ideas from the past 100 years of educational thought, the presenters invite team and inquiry-based learning that motivates students, develops deeper understandings and uses frequent, meaningful low-stakes assignments and assessment for engagement and mastery.

Objectives:
At the end of this session participants will be able to:
  1. Explain how and why it is important to move students towards intrinsic motivations and self-discipline based on the literature;
  2. Identify the place of peer review, cooperative learning techniques, short demonstration lectures, shared cases and scenarios and struggling with messy problems in constructing and assessing mastery;
  3. Transfer and apply some guided inquiry techniques that use frequent, low-stakes assignments to create the deeper learning that leads to mastery.
4:30pm - 5:30pm
TBD
Susquehanna
4:30pm - 5:30pm
The Call of the Story: Innovative Approaches in STEM Classrooms
Ambassador
Abstract:
Storytelling predates writing and has been employed as a pedagogical tool even before the advent of the written word. In this study we have demonstrated that story telling in the undergraduate STEM classroom [Introductory Genetics, Cell and Molecular Biology and Evolution courses] engaged at-risk students and motivated them to score well on subsequent examinations. Pre and post course tests were assessed and student surveys were undertaken to evaluate the success of this type of pedagogy. We conclude that this method of teaching can be introduced into STEM fields to motivate, engage and retain students in STEM disciplines.

Objectives:
  • To demonstrate that storytelling can be used as a powerful tool in the STEM curriculum;
  • To validate that "hard" science content can be taught effectively through different types of story telling;
  • To train the participants on how to incorporate this type of pedagogy into their own classes;
  • To illustrate how this pedagogical tool may help student retention in the STEM fields (including a discussion on student assessment data and student surveys);
  • To lead a mini-workshop where the participants will learn how to create their own stories and assignments through interactive group activities.
Karobi Moitra

Saturday

Time
8:30am - 8:50am
Change the Way Training is Done
Ballroom
Abstract:
The business environment has created pressure on corporations to become leaner. Bringing in new technology, however, is not a cure-all. Failure arises when organizations do not properly prioritize the proper resources. Organizations need to take a holistic view on the entire project. Training the employees on what they need to know.

Objectives:
  • Standing in front of students lecturing is not the objective;
  • Understanding what the learner needs to know;
  • Mentoring the learner;
  • Learners participating in the learning objective.
Kristi Dean
8:30am - 8:50am
Science Classics-based Teaching in Mixed-disciplinary Class: Challenges and Strategies
Ballroom
Abstract:
This presentation introduces a General Education Foundation course "In Dialogue with Nature" which is compulsory for all the undergraduate entrants in The Chinese University of Hong Kong. The challenges of teaching science classics to mixed-disciplinary classes are discussed. To facilitate the development of teaching strategies and activities, the learning styles of the students from different faculties are analyzed. Appropriate teaching strategies and activities for each faculty are suggested accordingly. Other strategies and techniques for teaching science classics and for teaching large mixed-disciplinary class are welcome for discussion.

Objectives:
  • To understand the development of a General Education Foundation course "In Dialogue with Nature" which is compulsory for all undergraduate entrants;
  • To identify the challenges of teaching science classics to students with mixed-disciplinary backgrounds;
  • To analyze the learning styles of students from different faculties;
  • To develop appropriate teaching strategies and activities according to the learning styles of the students from different faculties.
Kenneth Ming Li
8:30am - 8:50am
Student Evaluations: Evidence of Civic Engagement Learning's Success
Ballroom
Abstract:
Students in University of Hawai'i Ethnic Studies classes have for some years done community service at sites including public housing centers, homeless shelters, and high schools. An analysis of their capstone commentaries provides strong evidence of the validity of the community service literature's sense of the field's potential . After service, students attest to being more empathetic and supportive of disadvantaged and minority "others," to having a deeper appreciation of socio-economic problems, of feeling more committed to the people and communities they worked with. Here is evidence that some critical goals of student civic engagement can be achieved.

Objectives:
  • An understanding of the processes and goals of Community Service (Civic Engagement) Learning;
  • Evidence that Community Service Learning heightens student awareness of social problems;
  • Evidence that Community Service Learning heightens student empathy for different "others.";
  • Evidence that Community Service Learning heightens student desire to be supportive of disadvantaged people and communities.
Noel Kent
8:30am - 8:50am
The End of Faculty Academic Freedom (?): Accreditation; Assessment and Administrative Syllabus Control
Ballroom
Richard Vatz
8:30am - 8:50am
The Role of Assessment in Sustaining a Quality Enhancement Plan
Ballroom
Abstract:
Prairie View A&M University was in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools class of 2010. iREAD - Increasing Reading and Engagement for Academic Development was approved as the Quality Enhancement Plan. Because of the multiple components of the engagement and academic development expectations, a rigorous assessment plan was identified to maximize and sustain this plan. The plan involves a team of individuals assigned to 200 of the first time - full time students each year. The presentation will share the assessments identified and developed to secure data for the QEP fifth year report.

Objectives:
  • The participants will learn how to create sustainable strategies for assessing the Quality Enhancement Plan required by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools;
  • The participants will learn how to interpret data to make real time adjustments in the strategies of the Plan;
  • The participants will learn an effective method for managing a Quality Enhancement Plan.
8:30am - 8:50am
Title III Strengthening Institutions Grants: Facilitating faculty development and student success
Ballroom
Stephen Moore
9:00am - 10:00am
Plenary Presentation: Threshold Concepts and Troublesome Knowledge: A Transformational Approach to Learning
Ballroom
Abstract:
This presentation will discuss Threshold Concepts, a discipline-based and transformative model of learning in higher education. It is being used as a conceptual tool and an analytical framework to inform course and programme design. The Threshold Concepts Framework can be considered akin to a portal, opening up a new and previously inaccessible way of thinking about something. The model has over the last decade been adopted across a broad range of disciplines in many countries. (see http://www.ee.ucl.ac.uk/~mflanaga/thresholds.html)

It represents a transformed way of understanding, without which the learner cannot progress, and invariably involves a shift in the learner's sense of self. As a consequence of comprehending a threshold concept there is a transformed internal view of subject matter, subject landscape, or even world view. This transformation may be sudden or protracted, with the transition to understanding often involving 'troublesome knowledge'. Depending on discipline and context, knowledge might be troublesome because it is ritualised, inert, conceptually difficult, alien or tacit, because it requires adopting an unfamiliar discourse, or perhaps because the learner remains 'defended', resisting the inevitable shift in personal subjectivity that threshold concepts entail. Difficulty in understanding threshold concepts may leave the learner in a state of 'liminality', a suspended state or 'stuck place' in which understanding approximates to a kind of 'mimicry' or lack of authenticity.

This session will provide an outline of the Thresholds approach followed by an exploration of its implications for curriculum design.
Ray Land
10:10am - 11:10am
Integrating Dungeons & Dragons into Computer Science Courses as a Pedagogical Tool
Congressional
Abstract:
Research has shown that engaging students with games in courses can improve students' enjoyment of courses and as a result, increase their learning. We integrated role-playing game (RPG) aspects into a computer science course in the fall semester and are doing the same thing for a different course in the spring semester. A significant portion of the students enjoyed the RPG aspects of the course and provided positive feedback, as well as suggestions for improving the RPG aspects. In this presentation, we present what we did and what we learned from the experience.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn about integrating role-playing game (RPG) into course content;
  • Participants will learn about the benefits and pitfalls of RPG integration;
  • Participants will receive materials to infuse RPG aspects into their courses;
  • Participants will learn the value of soliciting student feedback through courses surveys;
  • Participants will learn about the challenges of student-based learning versus faculty-led learning and ways to support the transition.
10:10am - 11:10am
Linking leadership education to the leadership experience of working professionals through a virtual mentoring program
Ambassador
Abstract:
Learn about an innovative approach to helping students understand the relevance of their coursework to professional practice and their future careers. In this session we discuss the design of an introductory leadership studies course as an example of how students can be connected to working professionals who engage with them on course content and further student motivation and learning. We will share student conversations with their mentors and examine mentor relationships with faculty and the university community as we make connections to combine rigor with relevance.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn how structured virtual mentoring can be used to connect academic content with professional practice;
  • Participants will examine how they might be able to incorporate structured virtual mentoring into their own curriculum;
  • Participants will learn how structured virtual mentoring impacts students, mentors and the university community.
10:10am - 10:30am
Rethinking Measurement and Evaluation: Teaching with relevance and enjoyment
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Undergraduate professional preparation programs strive to communicate knowledge supporting students' success after graduation. Our instruction, however, often includes content for which students have no real-world context or appreciation. This presentation discusses redesign of a Measurement & Evaluation course to increase educational relevance as well as enjoyment. Real-world scenarios as vehicles for student learning, application and collaboration are reviewed. The contribution of role playing, with students as evaluators for designated stakeholders, is discussed as well as ways to improve undergraduates' understanding of the community they hope to serve through focused interactions with community professionals.

Objectives:
By the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
  • Differentiate among indicators of student capabilities (e.g., skill-based, knowledge-based) as contributors to students' success as entry level professionals;
  • Evaluate constraints of undergraduate preparation programs in providing students with knowledge and skills appropriate to their effective performance as entry level professionals;
  • Discuss implications for undergraduate preparation programs in marrying academic achievement with requirements for effective real-world performance
  • Identify ways to integrate real-world constraints and expertise in undergraduate education.
Susan Radius
10:10am - 11:10am
Rubrics Three Ways: High -Tech, Low-Tech, No-Tech for Formative Assessment
Potomac
Abstract:
In this interactive discussion, faculty in education, mathematics and journalism tell stories of rubric use as a process for formative assessment. Instead of focusing on rubric creation or rubrics as a grading outcome, we will focus on the process of using a rubrics to maximize student learning. We will explore how this process can be enacted in high tech (visual annotation apps), low tech (online discussion boards), and no tech (pencil-and-paper) arenas. Participants will identify a teaching challenge and investigate ways that rubric-as-a-process may impact their practice.

Objectives:
  • Exploration of three ways to support use of rubrics to enhance student learning;
  • Experience articulating challenges, and developing practical solutions for their own practice;
  • Identify common stages of using rubrics as formative assessment;
  • Appreciation of rubric-as-process versus rubric-as-grade.
10:10am - 11:10am
Teaching through Critique: Taking an Extradisciplinary Approach
Diplomat
Abstract:
What happens when you apply the signature pedagogy of the arts to a non-art course? You have the opportunity to create an active learning experience that provides students with a formative assessment of their work, targeted feedback, and employs peer instruction. This session will 1) establish evidence that the critique is a valuable activity that can help students develop critical thinking and verbal communication skills 2) provide best practices for coordinating a critique in a non-art class 3) strategize what a critique would look like in various disciplines.

Objectives:
After this session, participants will:
  • Believe in the critique as an effective teaching method that aligns to a variety of learning goals;
  • Know 5 research-based best practices for facilitating an effective critique;
  • Be able to facilitate a critique in their course.
10:10am - 11:10am
The Morality of Grading
Embassy
Abstract:
Abstract: Discussions of the ethics of grading too often start from a false premise: that assigning grades is an issue of distributive justice. But grades are not scarce goods, so the standards of justice do not apply. The fundamental ethical problem of grading is one of truthfulness. Letter grades are an extremely poor information technology. Complicating matters, the meaning of a grade cannot be the same for professors, students and readers of transcripts. I offer a standard for evaluating the morality of grading practices, and in conclusion offer some ideas about how they can influence student learning.

Objectives:
  • Understand the moral context and standard appropriate to evaluating grading practices;
  • Learn to evaluate grading practices for objectivity and fairness;
  • Learn new grading techniques that potentially make grades more meaningful;
  • Learn how traditional grading practices can discourage students efforts and undermine student learning.
Eleanor Wittrup
10:10am - 12:00pm
Using A Concept Ideation Process to Design an FLC Program
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
In this double session, participants will engage actively in the steps of a collaborative Concept Ideation process to envision, design, and plan a Faculty Learning Communities program that is mindful of the unique history and context of their university. The presenter will guide participants through the steps after situating the creation of one such program at her university within the faculty development literature on Faculty Learning Communities, and then sharing the analysis of the path taken by the program during the first three years.

Objectives:
  • Participants will situate the creation of one Faculty Learning Communities (FLC) program within the faculty development literature on FLCs;
  • Participants will appreciate the analysis of the path involved in creating a Faculty Learning Communities program that is mindful of the unique history and context of a university;
  • Participants (new and seasoned faculty developers and faculty) will use a collaborative Concept Ideation process to design appropriate FLC programs for their contexts that could result in greater student and faculty engagement in teaching and learning while also enhancing community among faculty.
10:50am - 11:10am
Bridging the Gap: Collaboration between Academic Departments and Campus Resources
Susquehanna
Abstract:
This session will discuss conclusions and implications drawn from extensive mixed method data collection centering on one University's Sport Management Interns. Specific attention will be directed towards the progression of curricula and utilization of campus and industry resources to ensure a superior level of student preparedness for and success in internships, field experiences, and subsequent post-collegiate endeavors. This research provides a foundation from which both faculty from various departments and staff from campus resource centers can benefit by further considering best practices in facilitating the internship component of curricula and student programs.

Objectives:
  • A comprehensive understanding of the findings from a four-semester data collection and analysis of sport management intern preparedness;
  • Recommendations for the appropriate course of practical action for the future (i.e., adaptations in curriculum, engaging internal/external resources etc.), benefiting students, faculty, and site supervisors/future employers associated with interns;
  • A directed discussion about how best to utilize various campus resources to bolster academic programs;
  • Suggestions for how to evolve programs to meet student needs.
11:20am - 12:00pm
Addressing Anxiety and Learning Outcomes During the Transition of a Course to Online Delivery
Embassy
Abstract:
Students enrolling in Quantitative Methods for Business at Miami University’s regional campuses generally have had little exposure to math beyond introductory algebra, and many have anecdotally reported experiencing anxiety, fear, and avoidance in math oriented courses. This study covers an academic year including a face-to-face section in the first semester, and an online section in the second semester. Changes in student anxiety as well as a review of the effectiveness of course learning activities and assessments are reviewed. This presentation covers data collection and analysis through the mid-point of the second semester of the study.

Objectives:
  • Explain ways to address student math anxiety in an online course;
  • Describe methods for delivering content in an online environment;
  • Discuss methods of evaluating the success of course enhancements.
Thomas Mays
11:20am - 12:00pm
Are You Testing What You Think You Are? How to Successfully Evaluate Test Items
Congressional
Abstract:
The purpose of this session is to teach faculty a method for successfully evaluating their written Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) assessments. The meaningfulness of exam scores relies on successfully measuring students' knowledge of a given subject. MCQs developed by untrained faculty often contain technical flaws that introduce random error leading to a decrease in the assessments' overall quality. Learning how to classify MCQ items as high quality (e.g., meeting recommended standards) or poor quality (e.g., being technically flawed) will help participants from all disciplines minimize testwiseness (guessing, cueing, etc.) from their own assessments.

Objectives:
Upon completion of the session, participants will be able to:
  • Identify violations of common item writing guidelines;
  • Recognize common technical flaws in multiple choice questions;
  • Develop strategies to evaluate in-house exams.
11:20am - 12:00pm
Flat Class: Democratizing the College Classroom with Collaborative Course Design
Diplomat
Abstract:
The traditional top-down way of educating students can promote non-participatory and even uncivil roles in society. How do we work within present-day institutional realities and stakeholder-expectations to re-socialize students to exercise their right of autonomy, practice of democracy and engagement of civility in their social settings? One approach is the use of the "Flat Class" structure in our classrooms. Join us if you would like to hear about our experiences using this approach where students design the syllabus and partner with teachers to run the class; and dialog around ways to democratize your class.

Objectives:
  • Value opportunities to collaborate with students to advocate for course offerings;
  • Identify strategies to enlist student and community participation;
  • Recognize ways classes can be reorganized to operate horizontally;
  • Create a plan for enlisting students to create a course syllabus.
11:20am - 12:00pm
Mastering Philosophic Concepts through Use and Application
Potomac
Abstract:
We look at the relationship between mastering philosophic concepts and the use and application of these concepts. This method stands in contrast to using thought alone or focusing on the philosophic text alone as a means to mastery. The author studies results of midterm exams and papers in contrast to final ones and illustrates the positive impact on student performance. He addresses the potential objection that application and use take students too far away from texts and arguments, and fails to help students understand the nature of philosophic inquiry. We conclude with reflections on the challenges of adopting this instructional method.

Objectives:
  • Gain the ability to identify and articulate the nature of philosophic questions and concepts;
  • Collaboratively create scenarios that aid in mastering philosophic concepts through their application;
  • Understand the potential objections to this approach and discuss possible responses;
  • Discuss the challenges of implanting this method.
Keith Fennen
11:20am - 12:00pm
The "Do's" and "Don'ts" of Teaching Blended (or Hybrid) Courses
Ambassador
Abstract:
What do students like and dislike about taking blended learning (or hybrid) courses? We asked; they told us. Over the past year, we began a comprehensive blended learning (or hybrid) program and collected feedback from students. In this session, you will be able to hear student perspectives on both our failures and successes with blended courses. From our research, we have summarized their feedback into a useful list of "do" and "don't" principles. These principles will help you to prepare and teach more effective blended learning courses. From this session, you will also gain a list of helpful additional resources on blended learning.

Objectives:
  • Inform participants on what we discovered from implementing a blended/hybrid learning program and what are research tells us;
  • Provide participants with a practical table that will help guide their blended learning practices;
  • Examine the pedagogical challenges that our faculty encountered as they prepared for blended learning classes;
  • Provide participants with additional resources and articles on effective teaching of blended/hybrid courses;
Ryan Baltrip
11:20am - 11:40am
Using Collaborative Notetaking Software in Higher Education- The Advantage of Web 2.0
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Etherpad is a collaborative software often employed by the open source programming community to have real-time extended dicussions among participants who cannot discuss things in real time. This is an online note-taking software that works as a real-time, immersive online tool that can be used in online classrooms and physical classrooms. The goal is to create one space for notetaking for all users in the class and create a productive and alternative space for laptop and tablet engagement. This presentation will focus on teaching and exploring this software for classes.

Objectives:
  • Understand how to apply etherpad to a variety of classroom situations: discuss at least 5-7 different classroom environments where the technology could be employed;
  • Introduce the technology - provide a link to all members to explore on their own, and monitor for sign in;
  • Create an etherpad and ask at least 40 percent of participants to contribute through signing in to page;
  • Show how students can be assessed by asking members of the audience to silently count and write down data metrics to then share with the group;
  • Use etherpad to practice commenting through post-conversation comment posting- create list of potential users to email following the discussion for further conversation (at least 40 percent).
Nikki Usher
11:40am - 12:00pm
Applying Blackboard Tools to Promote Contact Learning in Blended Classes
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Contract learning is used as a communication tool via which the educator and the adult learners come to an agreement of the teaching and learning. The main purpose is that the educator as a learning facilitator can use it to motivate students to be more responsible for their learning. However the quality of the instructor's management of contract learning is critically affected by the class size. Continued from the author??s previous study on group behaviors in blended classes, this study is aimed to discuss the effect of applying new learning tool-Blackboard to promote and manage contact learning in blended classes.

Objectives:
  • The participants will learn the idea of practicing contract learning in college blended classes;
  • The participants will learn how the presenter utilized the Blackboard course tools to facilitate contract learning;
  • The participants will learn how the students' cultural backgrounds affect the practice of contract learning, especially in Blackboard environment;
  • The participants will join the discussion and learn the limitation of the learning tools in college blended learning;
  • The participants will join the discussion and share the ideas to improve the quality of teaching, learning, and retention rate.
Hui-wen Tu
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Could GRIT Help to Shape the Learning Experience?
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
What qualities do we admire in learners? Mark Twain's bleak assessment that education is “the path from cocky ignorance to miserable uncertainty”, should make us reflect. Learning can be rough ride and yet we are busy building a system of education that develops in children the expectation that education is fun? How many pupils would understand Aristole's summary that "the roots of education are bitter but its fruit is sweet."? There are many examples of individuals who see failure as an opportunity to learn. Edison famously embraced having designed 700 light bulbs that failed as 700 steps towards a design that would work. Trial and error is a wonderful teacher of an observant and patient learner. The work of Carol Dweck and Angela Duckworth provide insight into facets of character that serve individuals well in education and life. A growth mindset and GRIT are a winning combination. The question is how to foster these habits of mind. Read more here. We will consider the results of a study in the University of Bristol that tracks the progress of new undergraduates and probes their personal history in hope that we will see the both the value and origins of GRIT and a growth mindset.
Phil Langton
1:00pm - 1:20pm
Engaging Science & Nonscience Majors: How I Taught Students to Think in Chemistry
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Chemistry is considered a tough class for most of the students. What if we could make it attractive enough to get their attention? What if we could break it down enough so everybody could understand it? . This is the challenge that we face in the classroom. To make students interested in the course first we need to show with our enthusiasm that we think the course is interesting and show them how what you say makes sense, as we have all experienced "you don't like what you don't understand". It's necessary to make them realize that there is logic on what you are explaining and that they are able to find out things by themselves. We need to teach them how to think so they can do it by themselves. In this presentation I will discuss how I met these challenges.

Objectives:
  • Discuss how to teach the students to think about a experiment;
  • Demonstrate how to make the students interested in the course;
  • Illustrate to make a tough course accessible to the students.
Ester Sesmero
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Engaging Students in a Reacting to the Past game about Frederick Douglass
Embassy
Abstract:
Reacting to the Past games are famous for producing lively, student-centered classes with extraordinarily high student engagement. Rather than hearing a set presentation on pedagogy, people attending this session will "do" the pedagogy, by "playing" a role-playing game about on slavery and abolitionism in the United States, circa 1845. While no preparation is required for this micro-game, students in Reacting classes are inspired to do more prep than is assigned. The Reacting pedagogy is used at many hundreds of institutions, spanning the full range of higher education, and can be used on your campus. Come see how!

Objectives:
  • Our session will introduce the Reacting to the Past pedagogy of elaborately designed, role-playing, face to face games used in college classrooms nationwide;
  • Engage the audience in actively participating in a micro version of a full Reacting game, "Frederick Douglass, Slavery, Abolitionism and the Constitution: 1845";
  • Show how students use oral communication and teamwork in Reacting games, forming strong learning communities;
  • Hold a discussion of how and why to use the RTTP pedagogy in one's own classroom.
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Student-Facilitated Exploratory Discussions and Critical Thinking Gains
Potomac
Abstract:
This presentation will present a student-facilitated learning model that has been developed by the Interactivity Foundation, a small non-profit foundation that dedicates itself to enhancing the deliberative discussion and civic engagement capacities of university students. This process invites faculty to take a coaching role as they encourage students to learn to facilitate their own learning. The presentation will examine data collected among Kansas State University Communication Studies students who took classes in which they learned to facilitate their own exploratory discussion projects. Projects extended through a full semester and required sustained engagement by students, which resulted in significant critical thinking learning gains-- evidenced by significant changes on thirteen of fourteen measures of critical thinking that were collected via student self-assessment at Time 1 and Time 2 (start v. end of semester). The presentation will then invite participants to explore using this style of discussion by examining the issue of first generation student success in higher education. Participants will have the opportunity to actively engage with one another in small, self-facilitated groups.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn about a student-facilitated model of exploratory discussion to effectively promotes critical thinking gains among students (participants would also learn how/why we suspect these critical thinking gains are made);
  • Participants would also have a chance to explore this pedagogy via active learning engagement of the process;
  • Finally, participants would have an opportunity to debrief/ask questions about how they might apply this method in their classrooms via interaction with the facilitator(s)/fellow presentation participants.
Suzanne Lea
1:00pm - 2:00pm
The Body of Knowledge
Congressional
Abstract:
The Body of Knowledge is an interactive workshop where participants will explore techniques derived from the F.M. Alexander Technique that promote embodied learning. The instrument of expression is the human body, inclusive of breath, movement, voice and thought. The unity of body and mind is the foundation of effective communication, active listening, sharing ideas and expanding perspectives. The art of teaching is a physical activity which demands presence and a teacher's physical presence is a dominant factor in the learning environment. This session will provide concrete tools for creating a more present and engaging physical environment to enhance learning.

Objectives:
  • To be more present with oneself, with students and with colleagues;
  • To recognize stimulus-response patterns that affect communicating and teaching;
  • To utilize and engage the body as an instrument of expression;
  • To teach techniques of active learning utilizing all six senses;
  • To identify the effects of stress and how that affects communicating and teaching, and learn techniques of how to manage stress productively while teaching;
  • To learn simple techniques that can easily be integrated into a teaching practice and shared with students.
Leslie Felbain
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Using an Assignment-Centered Course to Promote Student Learning
Diplomat
Abstract:
As two practitioners, one who used an assignment-centered course for the first time last spring and the other who has used an assignment-centered course for over ten years, we share the challenges, lessons learned, and rewards of using an assignment-centered course. We describe our course design which uses collaborative group projects, writing-across-the-curriculum principles, and mentoring of student groups, and share how an assignment-centered course increases student learning and invigorates our teaching.

Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to differentiate between an assignment-centered and a text-lecture centered course;
  • Participants will be able to explain how to use collaborative group projects along with writing-across-the-curriculum principles to actively engage students to increase student learning;
  • Participants will be able to explain the importance of mentoring and advising student-project groups;
  • Participants will be able to identity ways that an assignment-centered course invigorates teaching.
1:00pm - 2:00pm
You can do it: Integrating technology to enhance student learning
Ambassador
Abstract:
Plan! Teach! Grade! Repeat! Who has time to search for technology resources? 21st century learners yearn for technology in the classroom. Educators strive to search for effective technology practices that not only engage students but are based on solid research-based pedagogy. During this session, participants will learn about several instructional technology resources, which promote authentic student learning. Participants will have the opportunity to try the technology as create a product they can use in one of their courses. You can't miss this session!

Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to create an avatar, comic, instructional video, or Web 2.0 application;
  • Participants will discuss the ways the shared resources can enhance student learning;
  • Participants will identify possible applications of instructional technology website resources.
Jennie Carr
1:40pm - 2:00pm
A six step methodology for teaching fire science
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Many professors discuss how they know that they should not be using a "talking head approach" to lecturing in their college classes but simply do not know how to implement changed into their courses. This paper describes a six step process for teaching concepts that includes using videos, concept reinforcement, active student group learning, and puzzle/game like problems to solve. The methodology shown has been used successfully in both freshman and junior level classes with students in a wide range of ability and nationality.

Objectives:
  • Using active learning techniques to teach science concepts;
  • In-class activities;
  • Visual demonstrations such as videos.
Scott Rockwell
2:15pm - 3:15pm
Course Re-Design Incorporating the Principles of Universal Design for Learning
Congressional
Abstract:
Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a framework for designing courses to meet the various learning styles and abilities of the diverse student population. The UDL framework is based on the three principles of: multiple means of representation; multiple means of action and expression; and multiple means of engagement. It emphasizes a flexible syllabus to accommodate student needs while maintaining quality standards. We will review the principles of UDL and share our strategies for incorporating these guidelines. We will also discuss how we selected strategies to overcome barriers to learning and create the flexibility necessary to maximize student learning.

Objectives:
  • Describe and demonstrate how we: (a) Redesigned two courses and applied the guidelines of UDL; (b) Selected methods of instruction to enable a broad array formats for student engagement;
  • Share our experience in comprehending, designing & implementing a course to enable greater access & engagement using the UDL framework;
  • As a result of attending this session, participants will identify: (a) Various methods to successfully engage students in class activities; (b) Constraints and challenges for utilizing UDL course design.
2:15pm - 3:15pm
Faculty's New Toolbox: A Three Part Model for Skill Development
Embassy
Abstract:
The exponential growth of online or blended teaching and learning have motivated higher education's faculty into reaching into a "new" teacher's toolbox. Faculty members want to be more comfortable with technology; and wish to sharpen their skills in using learning management systems, multi-media and social media tools. This presentation will introduce a three-step method to faculty development in an evidence-based environment. In a session activity, attendees will break down the essential skills for creating an engaging and interactive online experience and create a plan to build their own 21st century teacher toolbox.

Objectives:
  • Attendees will hear about key trends in teaching with technology in higher education;
  • Attendees will learn how to identify and assess essential skills in delivering online and blended content;
  • Attendees will be introduced to a faculty development Objective, Competency, and Assessment model for online instruction.
Tracy Miller
2:15pm - 2:35pm
Integrating cognitive and psychomotor skills to improve student clinical performance
Susquehanna
Abstract:
The acquisition of cognitive and psychomotor skills is essential for many healthcare professionals. Cognitive skills may include planning, analysis and problem solving. Psychomotor skills can vary from fine motor skills required by dentists to gross motor skills required by physical therapists. Similarities and differences exist when acquiring skills in the cognitive and psychomotor domains. Although these skills may be acquired separately, for clinical performance to improve, the integration of these skills is crucial. Methods such as role playing, paper case patients, simulations, and standardized patients can be used to achieve this integration and improve clinical performance throughout the curriculum.

Objectives:
  • Participants will compare and contrast psychomotor skill acquisition to cognitive skill acquisition;
  • Participants will examine methods to integrate cognitive and psychomotor skills to improve the clinical performance of student healthcare workers;
  • Participants will distinguish types of feedback that can be utilized to foster cognitive and psychomotor skill acquisition;
Sue Leach
2:15pm - 3:15pm
TBD
Diplomat
Joanne Munroe
2:15pm - 4:30pm
Turning Excellent Teaching into the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
Excellence in teaching is an expectation of every faculty member. How can we transform excellence in teaching into the scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL)? Where do busy professionals find time to pursue scholarly projects? The secret, working smarter not harder! Make your work count twice; translate your teaching efforts into scholarship. We will present concrete steps for turning everyday teaching into scholarship. You will work collaboratively to identify SOTL projects in your own practice. Through facilitated exercises, rapid-cycle brainstorming, and peer feedback sessions, you will develop a practical, low-cost SOTL project that can be implement in your own classroom.

Objectives:
  • Identify a topic to explore through SOTL in your current work as an educator;
  • Develop a data collection and analysis plan to address/answer your purpose/question;
  • Critique and provide feedback to colleagues on their scholarship of teaching and learning project;
  • Apply the lessons learned to future professional development through the development of individual action plans.
2:15pm - 3:15pm
Walking the Walk, while Talking the Talk: 10 Best Practices for Teaching Online
Ambassador
Abstract:
Teaching evidence-based best practices to a room full of teachers? You better be using those practices yourself! This session will describe the course Innovation, Technology, and Teaching in Higher Education, a component of Temple University's Teaching in Higher Education Certificate. In this hybrid course, the facilitator applied "Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online" from Boettcher and Conrad's The Online Teaching Survival Guide (2010). Participants will hear examples of the application of these practices as well as lessons-learned. Activities will allow participants to apply these practices to their own course.

Objectives:
After this session participants will:
  • Know 10 Best Practices for Teaching Online;
  • Know learning outcomes from a case study that applied these practices to a hybrid, graduate-level course for college professors;
  • Be able to apply these best practices to their own courses.
2:55pm - 3:15pm
Contributing to Scholarship on Teaching and Learning: "Dos" and "Don'ts" from Two SOTL Journal Editors
Susquehanna
Abstract:
The editors of The Common Good: A SUNY Plattsburgh Journal on Teaching and Learning (http://digitalcommons.plattsburgh.edu/commongood/) will share proven strategies for crafting and publishing a scholarly article on teaching and learning. Presentation will include real, concrete examples of "Dos" and "Don't" for authors. More than simple common sense advice for any would-be journal contributor, this presentation draws directly from our experience working with instructors from a wide range of disciplines who wish to contribute to the SOTL. In addition, we will also briefly reflect on how editing a SOTL journal has given us new insights into the field as a whole.

Objectives:
  • Very briefly note some of the current major trends in the scholarship on teaching and learning;
  • From our editorial point of view, share with audience some specific strategies for crafting a successful article on the scholarship of teaching and learning;
  • From our editorial point of view, share with audience some specific pitfalls of researching and writing on teaching and learning.
3:30pm - 4:30pm
Adaptive Learning Helps Faculty Personalize Instruction, Improves Remedial Student Results
Ambassador
Abstract:
Personalized learning presents the right level of challenge, at the pace set by the student and with teaching style that maximizes understanding. The wealthy, knowing this, hire personal tutors. In the last few years, Adaptive Learning software has started to serve as a personal tutor. In January of 2013 Union County College started a pilot of Adaptive Learning to improve student performance in math. Several different populations that use the college were enrolled. Astoundingly all students greatly improved their performance using adaptive learning. The program was then tried at a large inner city high school, again with great success.

Objectives:
  • Contrast traditional approaches to remedial/developmental Math pedagogy to Adaptive Learning;
  • Discuss how technology and dashboards change the role and activities of the educator;
  • Explain how adaptive learning works to address the needs of faculty and students;
  • Argue that Adaptive Learning solves some the precessing problems with traditional pedagogy for "learning the basics";
  • Proceed with their own investigation of Adaptive Learning using the criteria for sections and list of Adaptive Learning purveyors.
3:30pm - 4:30pm
Developing an Active Learning, Experiential Communications Course for Non-Communications Majors
Congressional
Abstract:
Communication courses, particularly within the discipline, started as didactic-oriented courses to provide learners with the basic tenets of the science. As communication courses developed into offerings in other disciplines, this didactic orientation was carried over. For non-communications majors, in need of communications skills development, the didactic lecture model did not and does not provide the methodology by which these essential skills can be developed and mastered. Accordingly, this presentation will demonstrate how professional and trade programs can develop communication courses, that incorporate both active learning and experiential modalities through which learners can convert theoretical tenets into actual practiced skills.

Objectives:
  • Contrast the historical didactic instruction techniques used in communications courses designed for communications majors with the active learning instruction techniques being used in communications courses designed for non-communications majors;
  • Understand the limitations of didactic instruction in developing necessary communications skills in non-communications major students;
  • Identify methods of incorporating active learning and experiential education into a Healthcare Communications course;
  • Apply a system of active learning utilizing role play, self- and peer-assessment, and feedback provision to gain experience with actual communications skills development.
3:30pm - 4:30pm
Influence of an online poverty game on students attitudes toward people in poverty
Embassy
Abstract:
This presentation will focus on a program that seeks to change student perceptions about people who live in poverty. Negative attitudes toward those in low economic situations could interfere with the provision of high quality services for a wide range of disciplines. In using an online game to introduce students to the difficult decisions faced by those in poverty, our preliminary data show that this simulation experience can have a positive impact on student awareness and understanding. Our plan is to describe how the game was used with students from multiple health professions and to discuss whether this method can help students to be more effective advocates, more client focused and more empathetic when working with this population.

Objectives:
  • Outline the features of the online game in order to implement with a student population;
  • Describe the use of poverty simulations and attitudes toward poverty scales.;
  • Discuss evidence that using a simulation activity can impact student attitudes about poverty.
3:30pm - 4:30pm
Methods of Infusing Technology Into Any Teaching & Learning
Diplomat
Abstract:
There are many of us teaching at the post-secondary level that are afraid of taking ourselves off the stage and becoming the guide on the side while empowering students to use technology to communicate their new learning. This presentation will help teachers see how it is possible to use technology and STILL create meaningful and challenging tasks for students to complete that captivate digital learners and provide THEM with ways to use their skills to demonstrate knowledge, skills and affect germane to any course. This presentation can easily help those who teach both face-to-face and online since the challenge is the same—motivating the digital learner to be successful.

Objectives:
  • Participants will explore the wide variety of tools both online and otherwise useful in delivering classroom programming;
  • Participants will gain practice in selecting tools that work for them and their students;
  • Lowering the resistance level to integrating technology in the practice of late adopters of technology;
  • Participants will explore ways of successfully assessing student achievement as indicated through products created using technological tools;
  • Participants will be given easy entrance points to the use of technology in their teaching and learning at the post secondary level.
Howard Slepkov
3:30pm - 3:50pm
Techniques for Effective Facilitation and Management of Online Discussion Boards
Susquehanna
Abstract:
How can you effectively facilitate and manage an online discussion board? Good news, there are techniques that can transform how you use online discussion boards (and techniques that can make the online instructor's life a lot easier too). In this session, we will explore a few guiding questions: "how to manage a large online class?", "how to humanize online discussion?", "how to manage time spend facilitating a discussion board", and "how to encourage student participation in online discussions?" You will leave this session equipped with strategies that you can apply when teaching your next online course.

Objectives:
  • Inspire participants to see the pedagogical value of effectively facilitating and managing online discussion boards;
  • Inform participants on effective pedagogical strategies for facilitating and managing all types of online discussion boards;
  • Equip participants with techniques that they can apply in their next online course.
Ryan Baltrip
4:10pm - 4:30pm
Metacognition
Susquehanna
Abstract:
University of Maryland University College; Lehigh University, United States of America Metacognitive activities help students plan for tasks by thinking about preparatory skills that the students may have before class, such as social networking. Metacognitive skills also encourage students reflection on their ability to perform tasks. Writing Process with reflective journaling, peer discussions and peer assessments, self-monitoring and student self-assessments offer insight into their own writing process and interaction with a group. Student-directed pedagogical models and 21st century pop culture themes fuse to ignite a learning community for reflection, discovery, and social networking to motivate the 21st century student. Learning strategies based on Metacognitive processes focus on Multiple Intelligence Theory, Life Story Writing, Studying Oral Histories, Writing Process Theory, Learning Paradigm and Learning Communities. Globalization of the literary canon requires applications of the aspects of oral history traditions. My class is organized to become a learning community with a focus writing short stories as authentic assessments to develop student voices.

Objectives:
  • Student-directed pedagogical models;
  • 21st century pop culture themes;
  • Fuse to ignite a learning community for reflection, discovery, and social networking to motivate the 21st century student.
4:45pm - 5:25pm
A Formative Assessment Model for Higher Education Teaching and Learning
Congressional
Abstract:
Formative assessment is underused in higher education despite the growing body of research that confirms its benefits. Emerging learning formats and technological advancements coupled with a growing interest in learner-centered education has created an impetus for a renewed focus on the implementation of formative assessment in higher education contexts. This session will offer a model for implementing formative assessment strategies in college classroom environments through principles of course design. Examples of formative assessment strategies in various classroom formats are described and the benefits of formative assessment for learners, instructors, and educational systems are explained. Embedding formative assessment into course design is the most effective method of increasing student engagement and motivation at the course level.

Objectives:
  • Participants will gain exposure to and increased understanding of formative assessment concepts and research supporting the use of formative assessment;
  • Participants will learn about the types of and importance of feedback;
  • Participants will learn about a model of formative assessment for planning and instruction;
  • Participants will plan a sample lesson using an instruction planning template based on the presented model;
4:45pm - 5:25pm
Challenges and Dilemmas Facing Ethical School Leaders
Ambassador
Abstract:
School leaders have been ethically challenged to make difficult decisions while coping with high stakes pressures from political leaders and the public, along with school accountability legislation. More recently, leaders' codes of ethics compete with conflicting state and federal standards, laws, landmark state and Supreme court cases, community/student interests, and special interests groups for decision-making. The objective of this paper will be to summarize standards, leadership ethics, and nature of pressures creating leaders' dilemmas of making the best decisions that balance these conflicting elements. Following this discussion, the audience will be involved in real life decision-making situational scenarios emphasizing ethics.

Objectives:
  • Participants will understand the difference between state and federal education standards and leadership behavior ethics;
  • Participants will gain an understanding of the recent changes of school leadership in face of new challenges;
  • Participants will gain an understanding of the challenges and dilemmas face by today's public school leaders in balancing ethics with standards in their decision-making in the best interest of students, parents, and community stakeholders;
  • Participants will enhance their interpersonal skills of working with participants in their respective groups to solve specific real-life case scenarios faced by school administrators in their ethical decision-making.
4:45pm - 5:25pm
Flipping the Classroom in Higher Education: A Design-Based Research Study to Develop a Flipped Classroom Framework
Embassy
Abstract:
The flipped classroom approach has been adopted by instructors in an effort to move away from the traditional lecture used by many in higher education. The purpose of this presentation is to share a flipped classroom framework developed using design-based research. This framework will provide a springboard for other scholars and practitioners to further examine the efficacy of this specific blended approach to learning, and for those interested in using the flipped classroom approach, it is a framework that can be used and adapted to meet the needs of their students.

Objectives:
  • Provide the participants with a brief overview of the flipped classroom approach;
  • Provide an overview of the research that was conducted to develop a flipped classroom framework. This includes an explanation of the design-based research methodology used in this study;
  • Provide the participants with the flipped classroom framework developed from the study.
Helen Crompton
4:45pm - 5:25pm
Instructional Strategies designing Geometry in Art as an Online Course
Susquehanna
Abstract:
Geometry in Art is a course that examines underlying mathematical principles relating to different aspects of art and architecture. These principles can include symmetry and tiling, solids and golden ratio, perspective, surfaces and motion, etc. Different strategies/innovations need to be considered carefully when developing this as a course online. This course needs to be as effective online as a face-to-face or hybrid format. Strategies need to be considered concerning how students and instructors interact with these innovations and how they influence teaching and learning. Student??s attitudes toward Geometry in Art and achievement will be discussed.

Objectives:
  • Identify instructional strategies assisting students to visualize concepts such as symmetry and tiling;
  • Identify technological innovations to assist students in visualizing concepts;
  • Describe how students can grasp and visualize concepts such as frieze and wallpaper patterns;
  • Analyze different ways students and instructors can interact online based on topics in a Geometry in Art class;
  • Analyze how to handle assessments such as problem sets, quizzes, projects, etc.
Pamela Lowry
4:45pm - 5:25pm
The perceived key concepts in biology, geology, and chemistry across educational levels
Cabinet / Judiciary
Abstract:
Come see and discuss which concepts college students and college professors stated were the most important concepts in their subject areas. Over a one-year period data was collected from high school teachers, college students, and college professors about what they perceived were the most important concepts in their areas of study. Data was collected in biology, chemistry, and geology to determine how much overlap existed between perceived key concepts. We will discuss the possibilities for completing such a data collection as a teaching activity or research opportunity in your setting.

Objectives:
  • Share the perceived key concepts among college freshman, college seniors, and college instructors in biology, chemistry, and geology;
  • Discuss how the experience can be recreated into a teaching experience;
  • Provide context and about the connection to high school teachers' perception and ongoing work at our university to coordinate high school teacher and college instructor communication;
  • Complete a concept exploration depending on time length of session.
4:45pm - 5:25pm
Using Student Feedback to Evaluate the Effectiveness of “Place-Based” Learning Exercises in Urban Field Experience Classes
Diplomat
Abstract:
Guided learning experiences outside of the classroom can be an effective teaching tool for relating the urban built environment to socio-economic processes that both shape and reinforce patterns of inequality. Drawing from focus groups with students who previously participated in off-campus, urban field courses, the author presents feedback from participants on the effectiveness of reinforcing key concepts from readings and lectures in guided walking tours of urban areas. After discussing with the focus group the pedagogical rationale for “place-based learning,” the students were asked to evaluate the degree to which this pedagogical approach effectively met the course learning objectives.

Objectives:
  • Summarize the pedagogical rationale for “place-based learning”;
  • Demonstrate how to design, implement and assess student learning outcomes for guided field-based learning experiences;
  • Present assessment data on the effectiveness of reinforcing reading and lectures with learning exercises outside of the classroom;
  • Provide resources for developing field-based learning experiences.
Daman Scott

Sunday

Time
9:00am - 11:00am
Plenary Presentation: Teaching for Life: The Importance of Hope and Empathy
Judiciary
Abstract:
All too often, faculty focus on technology and pedagogical strategies in improving teaching and learning. In recent years, new and compelling research has been published examining the often noted “affective” domains of student learning. This presentation will explore new and exciting research on the importance of academic hope (other types of hope will be discussed) and the role of empathy in increasing student learning and success. In other words, this presentation will discuss how “emotion” is an important and significant tool in even the most “scientific” of college classrooms. Participants will learn about research and explore ways to make the college classroom connected to the lives of our students.

Objectives:
  • Participants will learn about research on measure of hope and empathy in the college classroom and the importance of each as predictors of student success;
  • Participants will have an opportunity to learn about their own levels of hope and empathy and the role that might play in predicting student success;
  • Participants will explore ways they can increase hope and empathy in their teaching;
  • Participants will receive a bibliography along with teaching tips they can use on Monday when they return to their college campuses.